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Woman reveals what it’s REALLY like to have Amish in-laws in eye-opening TikToks


An Indiana woman has lifted the lid on what it’s really like to have Amish in-laws, explaining that their impressive cleaning habits make her ‘feel like c**p’ — but they will go above and beyond to help her if she is in need. 

Kristen Mullet, 31, has opened up about her Amish side of the family in a series of TikTok videos that she started posting in early 2020. She is not Amish, and her husband chose not to be baptized into the church as an adult. 

In her first TikTok, she recalled feeling a sense of inadequacy while listening to her in-laws discuss how often they clean the outside of their windows, something she had never done before. 

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Candid: Kristen Mullet, 31, has opened up about her Amish side of the family in a series of TikTok videos that she started posting in early 2020

Family: She is not Amish, and while her husband was raised in an Amish family, he chose not to be baptized into the church as an adult

Family: She is not Amish, and while her husband was raised in an Amish family, he chose not to be baptized into the church as an adult 

‘My sisters-in-law and my mother-in-law start talking about their cleaning habits, which will make you feel like c**p,’ she said. ‘They start asking each other, “How often do you clean your windows?”

‘My one sister-in-law says once a week. The other one says every two weeks, and my mother-in-law says, “Oh, usually right before church on the inside and the outside. Inside once a week. Outside I do at least once a month.”‘

Mullet made a face as she admitted she couldn’t think of ever washed her windows ‘except for the inside.’  

‘Way to make you feel real incompetent,’ she said, gritting her teeth. 

The mother of two’s video has been viewed more than 162,000 times, and many people in the comments could relate to the situation. 

‘I work in a primarily Amish town here in Indiana. THEY’RE ALWAYS BUYING CLEANING PRODUCTS IN MASS QUANTITIES. It’s insane!’ one person wrote. 

‘I’m friends with a lot of Amish and they are all SO HARD WORKING,’ someone else agreed. ‘They make me feel so lazy! They don’t stop! It’s amazing actually.’ 

Looking back: Mullet said she met her husband at a high school party in the fall of 2007

Looking back: Mullet said she met her husband at a high school party in the fall of 2007 

Someone else shared: ‘I have never washed my windows… ever. Not even the inside. Maybe I should.’

Viewers also had a lot of questions for Mullet about Amish life, and in a follow-up video, she explained that the rules and regulations in the Amish community vary based on where they live and go to church. 

Mullet met her husband at a high school party in the fall of 2007, and they have been together ever since. Some were confused as to how he still has close ties to his family if he never joined the church. 

She shared in another clip that her husband wasn’t ‘shunned’ by his family because he was never baptized into the Amish church as an adult. The Amish favor adult baptism because they view it as a lifetime commitment.  

‘If they join the church and then they leave, that’s usually when that shunning craziness happens,’ she noted. ‘But like I said, it’s all different everywhere you go.’

Mullet also revealed that she and her children are the only members of the family who don’t speak fluent Pennsylvania Dutch, a dialect of High German. 

FYI: Mullet explained that the rules and regulations in the Amish community vary based on where they live and go to church

FYI: Mullet explained that the rules and regulations in the Amish community vary based on where they live and go to church

FYI: Mullet explained that the rules and regulations in the Amish community vary based on where they live and go to church

Keeping it real: Mullet admitted that she will never get used to going into her in-laws' bathroom and not having a light to turn on

Keeping it real: Mullet admitted that she will never get used to going into her in-laws’ bathroom and not having a light to turn on 

The mom said the language is ‘ridiculously hard’ to learn, and she recounted how her seven-year-old son was left out while playing with his cousins at her in-law’s home.    

‘All of his cousins speak Dutch because all of them, either both of their parents came from Amish or both of them are still Amish, so all of them speak Pennsylvania Dutch fluently,’ she explained. ‘My child doesn’t.’ 

While the kids were playing games, her son’s cousins were all speaking Pennsylvania Dutch, prompting her husband to intervene.  

‘My husband stepped over and said, “Hey, can you guys try to speak English because you would feel really bad if I came over and just started speaking Spanish to you and you wouldn’t understand,”‘ she said. 

‘My sister-in-law pipes up, “What do you mean? I didn’t know Ethan didn’t speak Dutch.”‘

Mullet let out a sigh, adding: ‘My mother-in-law has told all of them multiple times that they need to speak English at all family functions so we all understand. Some people are oblivious.’

She has also admitted that she will never get used to going into her in-laws’ bathroom and not having a light to turn on. 

Difficulties: Mullet and her children are the only ones in the family who don't speak Pennsylvania Dutch, a dialect of High German

Difficulties: Mullet and her children are the only ones in the family who don't speak Pennsylvania Dutch, a dialect of High German

Difficulties: Mullet and her children are the only ones in the family who don’t speak Pennsylvania Dutch, a dialect of High German 

Community: But despite the differences and difficulties, Mullet stressed that the Amish know how to take care of their loved ones and will always lend a helping hand

Community: But despite the differences and difficulties, Mullet stressed that the Amish know how to take care of their loved ones and will always lend a helping hand

‘Every single time I go into their bathrooms, I put my hand on the wall to flip the switch to turn on the bathroom light,’ she said. 

‘I know their house has no electricity. I know for the most part they don’t have flippy switch lights, but every single time I go into a bathroom — because you know you need a light in the bathroom — I go to flip the switch.’

But despite the differences and difficulties, Mullet stressed that the Amish know how to take care of their loved ones.  

‘The first thing the Amish know how to do is really well is they know how to keep up with you, and that is if you are friends, if you are a neighbor, if you are family member, if you are whatever,’ she said. 

‘They will make sure they keep up with you. They will call you on a phone that’s not even in their house. They’ll write you letters. They’ll give you anything you need. They’ll make sure to keep up with you if they care about you. 

‘If you have any sort of tragedy, illness, funeral, anything, they will make sure they help you,’ she added. ‘They will help you and come find you as they find out what happened. They don’t wait. They don’t stop. 

‘They’ll come clean your house. They’ll feed you. They’ll make sure your children are taken care of. They’ll help you no matter what because they know how to take care of one another.’



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