Woman reveals she brought her ‘pet’ house spider when she moved into her boyfriend’s place


A woman has revealed how her boyfriend went from being ‘horrified’ of her one-year-old ‘pet’ house spider to catching flies for her in his spare time.

The Victorian woman said her partner was in shock when she informed him the spider, which lived on her kitchen window sill, would also be moving in with him.  

‘When I moved into my partner’s I told him I was bringing my spider,’ the woman wrote in a post on Facebook.

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A woman has revealed how she brought her house spider to her boyfriend’s place when they moved in together

‘I scooped her into a container with her little vegetable boxes and plonked her on the window here. He just couldn’t believe it,’ she said.

But after a year sharing the same space the man is very fond of the spider who the couple affectionately describe as their ‘little girl’. 

The once horrified ‘boyfriend’ is now fascinated by the two-year-old spider’s webs.

‘This is a story of what true love can achieve,’ the woman wrote about the man’s relationship with her spider. 

She shared a video of the spider being fed a live fly and asked how long they could expect their ‘little girl’ to live.

And the post quickly went viral with the video being watched over 64,000 times in the spider identification group.

‘I’ve become attached to my house spiders as well, they are an essential part of our household, so I can see why you wanted to bring her along,’ one man said, explaining the species usually live up to three years.

The spider is now two years old and is affectionately called 'our little girl' by the couple

The spider is now two years old and is affectionately called ‘our little girl’ by the couple

‘Being at the back end of her life, it’s possible a male will come along and do the deed, leading to a new generation of humble badumna’s left to guard your house from all those pesky flies.’ he said.

‘That’s not a black house spider, that is a black castle spider. Very impressive web,’ another woman said.

‘This is so sweet. I don’t think they live a terribly long time, but how amazing you’ve had this relationship with a creature so many others are scared of,’ one woman commended. 

Others said they had similar experiences with the badumna spider, keeping them as family ‘pets’ for four or more years. 

‘We had one on our window sill in the laundry. We named her Rowena and she lived for just under four years. We gave her flies a couple times a week and sprayed her web with water on hot summer days,’ one woman said, adding the whole family were sad when she died. 

House spiders make 'messy' funnel style webs and live on average for between two and three years

House spiders make ‘messy’ funnel style webs and live on average for between two and three years

‘I had a little badumna that lived in the window sill above my toilet. I was only in the home for a year but I named her charlotte because she just had a very motherly energy. She always crawled out when i walked into the bathroom and it just felt like she was watching over me,’ another woman revealed.

Some pleaded for updates from the woman on the family’s ‘love story’. 

‘Ok well now we’re all invested in this little one’s life. Please continue to give us regular updates.’

Others were desperate to know if she had a name.

‘We really just call her our little girl, sometimes shalob like from lord of the rings or little fatso,’ she told Femail.

And some warned the woman’s partner might be less understanding when one spider quickly becomes many more.

'I had one in our bathroom that I looked after for a while. One morning I walked into the bathroom and there were babies EVERYWHERE I counted 48 but there were more,' a man said

‘I had one in our bathroom that I looked after for a while. One morning I walked into the bathroom and there were babies EVERYWHERE I counted 48 but there were more,’ a man said

What’s a badumna spider? 

The badumna is commonly known as the black house spider and is widespread throughout Australia, New Zealand and Japan.

The black house spider usually have untidy looking lace webs with funnel-style entrances.

The female spider never leaves her web unless forced to, but keeps on repairing it – old webs can look grey and woolly from constant additions of silk.

Bites to humans are infrequent but may be painful, cause localised swelling, nausea, vomiting and sweating.

Source: Australian Museum

‘Love your story, is boyfriend prepared for that web to become a nursery and a few hundred babies? I only say this because I have that but on an outside wall. One web is now 20 or more,’ one man said.

‘I had one in our bathroom that I looked after for a while. One morning I walked into the bathroom and there were babies EVERYWHERE I counted 48 but there were more,’ another man said.

And another woman had a similar story to share.

And another woman had a similar story to share

And another woman had a similar story to share

‘I had that experience with one in my kitchen window. I was fascinated and allowed the eggs to hatch, as they burst from the sac my fascination turned to ‘oh crap’,’ she wrote. 

Others shared photos of their spider friends living in garages, bathrooms and even bedrooms.

‘Thank goodness I am not the only one, sometimes I will spray some water on the web and think I have gone crazy,’ one woman said.

The post attracted 60 comments before comments were closed by admin to give other posts in the group a chance to be seen. 



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