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Trump spokesman Taylor Budowich files lawsuit against January 6 committee


A current spokesman for former U.S. President Donald Trump filed a lawsuit on Friday after the January 6 House Committee requested his financial documents.

The committee used a subpoena to obtain the documents from JPMorgan Chase to seek out the source of funding from an organization that helped promote a rally preceded by the Capitol riots. 

Spokesman Taylor Budowich said in a court filing that he has cooperated extensively with the congressional committee investigating the deadly Jan. 6 attack on the U.S. Capitol.  

In the lawsuit, filed in federal court in the District of Columbia, Budowich said he has produced more than 1,700 pages of documents and provided about four hours of sworn testimony to the House of Representatives panel.     

‘The Select Committee acts absent any valid legislative power and threatens to violate longstanding principles of separation of powers by performing a law enforcement function absent authority to do so,’ the complaint reads.  

‘Mr. Budowich has not been afforded the opportunity to review the subpoena at issue in order to ascertain the extent or scope of information and records requested; moreover, the Select Committee has dispensed with all procedural rules, failed to accord due process, and neglected to provide formal notice.’  

Trump spokesman Taylor Budowich is fighting a subpoena from the January 6 House Committee after they requested his financial documents from JPMorgan Chase

In the lawsuit, Budowich said that he produced more than 1,700 pages of documents and gave four hours of sworn testimony to the House of Representatives panel

In the lawsuit, Budowich said that he produced more than 1,700 pages of documents and gave four hours of sworn testimony to the House of Representatives panel

The committee is trying to obtain the documents to find information linked to a rally that was attended by former President Donald Trump prior to the January 6 riots

Budowich, at a recent deposition, answered questions about the financing and planning of a speech by Trump to supporters near the White House on Jan. 6 that preceded the violence at the Capitol that day.

Budowich’s lawsuit sought a court order blocking the House committee from gaining access to his financial records at JPMorgan Chase & Co.

‘The subpoena seeks personal financial material that is irrelevant to any conceivable legislation and not pertinent to any purported purpose of the Select Committee,’ Budowich said in the lawsuit. 

The subpoena had first been sent by the committee to JP Morgan Chase on November 23 with notice sent to Budowich’s Sacramento home complying with it on Wednesday, according to Fox News.

He later found the deadline set for Friday so he could file something to block the release of the financial documents to the January 6 Committee.  

‘After complying completely with the Committee, including sitting for a four-hour deposition on December 22nd, I returned home on December 23rd only to find a notice from my banking institution, JPMorgan Chase, that they’d be handing over my banking records to the committee if I did not provide a court-ordered stoppage by December 24th, he said in the statement.  

‘To add to the absurdity, neither the committee nor JPMorgan Chase will provide me with a copy of the actual contents of the subpoena.’

He claims that he has been cooperative in the investigation and claims he has not received a copy of the subpoena

He claims that he has been cooperative in the investigation and claims he has not received a copy of the subpoena

Supporters of President Donald Trump are seen outside the US Capitol on January 6 

He also noted that the subpoena lacks ‘a valid legislative purpose’ and that requesting his private financial information violates his First Amendment rights. 

‘For me, this complaint being filed in federal court is not about politics or partisanship.

‘Government should not be a weapon that’s freely used against political opponents and private citizens — but it seems like this Democrat-led Congress is intent on codifying that precedent.

‘Democracy is under attack. However, not by the people who illegally entered the Capitol on January 6th, 2021, but instead by a committee whose members walk freely in its halls every day.’

Budowich’s lawsuit is the latest in a flood of litigation by targets of the committee seeking to prevent it from enforcing its subpoenas for information, but it is the first lawsuit to focus on a subpoena for financial records.

This week, former Trump adviser Michael Flynn and right-wing radio host Alex Jones filed separate lawsuits alleging the Select Committee was not lawfully constituted and its subpoenas for their testimony are therefore unlawful.

An appeals court has rejected that argument, ruling on Dec. 9 that the committee was valid and entitled to see White House records Trump has tried to shield from public view. Trump on Thursday appealed that decision to the U.S. Supreme Court.

The committee has issued more than 50 subpoenas and heard from more than 300 witnesses in its investigation of the attack.



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