Entertainment

Retired NFL quarterback Jay Cutler, 38, predicts ‘CTE is coming’ and says he has memory issues


Retired NFL quarterback Jay Cutler, 38, predicts ‘CTE is coming’ for him as he continues to deal with memory issues after suffering an estimated 15 concussions during his career

  • Retired NFL quarterback Jay Cutler has revealed that he’s battling the neurological effects of repeated blows to the head, including memory loss
  • The 38-year-old predicts he’ll have the degenerative brain condition, CTE
  • Cutler estimates he suffered around 15 concussions during his 12-year career 

Retired NFL quarterback Jay Cutler has revealed that he’s battling the neurological effects of repeated blows to the head and he believes he will eventually suffer from chronic traumatic encephalopathy (CTE) if he’s not battling the degenerative brain disease already.

‘I would say memory and stuff like that,’ the former Pro Bowler told Pardon My Take, a Barstool Sports podcast. ‘CTE is coming at some point… without a doubt.’

He said he thinks CTE is inevitable for most NFL players: ‘I think if you play long enough, it’s gonna happen to you.’

Retired NFL quarterback Jay Cutler has revealed that he’s battling the neurological effects of repeated blows to the head and he believes he will eventually suffer from chronic traumatic encephalopathy (CTE) if he’s not battling the degenerative brain disease already

Cutler estimates he’s endured as many as 15 concussions over his 12-year career with the Denver Broncos, Chicago Bears, and Miami Dolphins, although officially, he was diagnosed with only four, according to sportsinjurypredictor.com.

The 38-year-old said he is trying to be proactive about the problem by taking an IV drip of nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide, which is a new treatment for the condition.

Cutler was sacked 322 times during his 12-year career with the Broncos, Bears and Dolphins, but that represents only a fraction of the hits he absorbed over that time.

Chicago Bears' Jay Cutler sustains a concussion on a sack by New York Giants' Aaron Ross in the second quarter at New Meadowlands Stadium in East Rutherford, New Jersey in 2010

Chicago Bears’ Jay Cutler sustains a concussion on a sack by New York Giants’ Aaron Ross in the second quarter at New Meadowlands Stadium in East Rutherford, New Jersey in 2010

He referenced two concussions while speaking with Pardon My Take.

‘The Texans one was bad,’ he said, referencing a hit he took from former NFL Defensive Player of the Year JJ Watt in 2012.

WHAT IS CTE? 

Chronic traumatic encephalopathy (CTE) is a degenerative brain disease that is caused by repeated hits to the head. Over time, these hits result in the accumulation of tau protein around the brain, which can lead to confusion, depression and eventually dementia.

There have been several retired football players who have come forward with brain diseases, many of whom attribute their condition to the game. 

More than 1,800 former athletes and military veterans have pledged to donate their brains to the Concussion Legacy Foundation for CTE research.

CTE was usually associated with boxing before former NFL players began revealing their conditions. 

Several notable players who committed suicide were posthumously diagnosed with the disease, such as Junior Seau and Aaron Hernandez. 

‘I think we were playing Washington and I got — it was a DB, I forgot who it was — and I just got slung around,’ Cutler said of another hit. ‘He just slung me around and threw me down and the side of my head hit and that’s one of the only times I was out out. I was out for a second, then got up and walked off.’

CTE can only be diagnosed posthumously.

Several former NFL players who were diagnosed with CTE died by suicide, including Adams’s former Patriots teammate, Aaron Hernandez, who hanged himself in prison following a murder conviction.

‘We don’t know why people get CTE,’ Dr. Erin Manning, a neurologist at the Hospital for Special Surgery in New York, told DailyMail.com in 2018. ‘I think the most that it’s been looked at is in football players, but all that we know is what the brain looks like after they die. We don’t know what happens during people’s lives. We also don’t know how the findings correlate with people’s symptoms.’

As Manning explained, there is no established connection between football and CTE, nor is there a proven link between concussions and CTE: ‘There’s a lot of research that needs to be done to fill in the blanks there.’

To many, the 2017 Boston University CTE Center study that posthumously diagnosed 110 out of 111 former NFL players with the disease seemed rather convincing, if not conclusive.

According to Lee E. Goldstein, a professor at Boston University School of Medicine and College of Engineering, concussions may not be an indicator for CTE, which can lead to lead to behavioral or cognitive issues, and even dementia.

‘We have a substantial number of cases in the [brain] bank who have died and meet the neuropathological diagnostic criteria for CTE, and have never had a concussion,’ Goldstein told DailyMail.com in 2019.

Cutler is sacked by New York Jets safety Jamal Adams during a 2017 game in New Jersey

Cutler is sacked by New York Jets safety Jamal Adams during a 2017 game in New Jersey 

Advertisement



Source link

Related Articles

Back to top button