Pure animal attraction: Amazing pictures show softer side of pack of savage African wild dogs


A series of remarkable photographs set to be published in a new book show the softer side of Africa’s wild dog, often known as the continent’s most successful hunter.

The stunning snaps show the affectionate side of the wild dog – which is known locally as a painted wolf – as they hunt together through the African plains and stare straight down the camera lens.

Among the photo set are wild dogs affectionately nudging each others heads, a group of pups relaxing together and a pair of the animals sharing a joyful greeting. 

The images were compiled by photographer Margot Raggett for a new book Remembering African Wild Dogs, which is set to be published on 8 November.

The book has been pre-funded with a Kickstarter campaign that has so far raised £109,246 – over four times its original target of £20,000. 

Stunning photographs showcase the work of the winners of a competition for places in an upcoming charity book called Remembering Wild Dogs 

The book has been pre-funded with a Kickstarter campaign that has so far raised £109,246 - over four times its original target of £20,000

The book has been pre-funded with a Kickstarter campaign that has so far raised £109,246 – over four times its original target of £20,000 

All profits from the book will go on lion conservation projects in Africa, with many of the images showcasing the more affectionate side of the African wild dog (pictured, two dogs greeting one another)

All profits from the book will go on lion conservation projects in Africa, with many of the images showcasing the more affectionate side of the African wild dog (pictured, two dogs greeting one another) 

Margot Raggett and other wildlife photographers have created the coffee table photography book for charity to raise awareness about the threats that African wild dogs face

Margot Raggett and other wildlife photographers have created the coffee table photography book for charity to raise awareness about the threats that African wild dogs face

The animals are the most effective hunters in Africa, perhaps in the world, with a success rate of around 90 per cent in their hunts, compared with lions’ 30 per cent. 

All profits from the sale of the books at that stage will be donated to projects protecting the featured species.

Margot and other wildlife photographers have created the coffee table photography book for charity to raise awareness about the threats that wild dogs face.  

Remembering African Wild Dogs is the sixth in a series of photography books created by Margot and her campaign, which has already raised a whopping £775,000 for conservation projects in Africa and Asia.  

Remembering Wild Dogs is the fourth in a series of photography books created by Ms Raggett and her campaign has already raised over £700,000 for conservation projects in Africa and Asia

Remembering Wild Dogs is the fourth in a series of photography books created by Ms Raggett and her campaign has already raised over £700,000 for conservation projects in Africa and Asia

These dogs are very social, living in packs of between six and 20, and have been known to share food and to assist weak or ill members (pictured, a group of young pups)

These dogs are very social, living in packs of between six and 20, and have been known to share food and to assist weak or ill members (pictured, a group of young pups)

Posting on Kickstarter, Margot explained: ‘We have been overwhelmed by the support our simple idea for these books has had. 

‘Ask the best wildlife photographers to donate their most beautiful work on a species, make and sell books to raise awareness and funds and create a collectable series – it really seems to have struck a cord with animal lovers, photographers and conservationists everywhere.

‘And not only that, but it has also caught the imagination of presidents and celebrities across the world, who have also shown us incredible support.’ 

The book features stunningly candid shots of the animals in their natural habitat in the African plains.  

Past fans of the Remembering Wildlife series include Pierce Brosnan, Michelle Pfeiffer, Joanna Lumley and Russell Crowe (pictured, the animals greeting each other with joy)

Past fans of the Remembering Wildlife series include Pierce Brosnan, Michelle Pfeiffer, Joanna Lumley and Russell Crowe (pictured, the animals greeting each other with joy) 

One of the photographs set to be published in the Remembering African Wild Dogs shows the animals lying beneath a tree under the Milky Way (Taken in the Khwai/Moremi Reserve in Botswana)

One of the photographs set to be published in the Remembering African Wild Dogs shows the animals lying beneath a tree under the Milky Way (Taken in the Khwai/Moremi Reserve in Botswana)

African wild dogs live in packs that are usually dominated by a monogamous breeding pair, according to National Geographic. 

The female will deliver a litter between two and 20 pups, which are then cared for by the entire pack.

These dogs are very social, and packs have been known to share food and to assist weak or ill members.

African wild dogs hunt in formidable, cooperative packs of six to 20 (or more) animals. Larger packs were more common before the dogs became endangered. 

African wild dogs live in packs that are usually dominated by a monogamous breeding pair, according to National Geographic

African wild dogs live in packs that are usually dominated by a monogamous breeding pair, according to National Geographic 

The dogs are often frequently killed by farmers who fear they will attack their livestock. 

African wild dogs hit the headlines in the UK recently after 16 animals were killed at a safari park when a pack escaped from their enclosure due to damage caused by Storm Ciara earlier this month.

Staff at West Midland Safari Park in Bewdley, Worcestershire, were left ‘extremely saddened’ by the loss of six deer and 10 sheep.

The wild dogs were returned to their compound unharmed.

The photographs were compiled by Margot Raggett, the resident photographer of luxury safari lodge Entim Camp, for a new book Remembering African Wild Dogs, which is set to be published on 8 November

The photographs were compiled by Margot Raggett, the resident photographer of luxury safari lodge Entim Camp, for a new book Remembering African Wild Dogs, which is set to be published on 8 November



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