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Politically polarized Americans move to states with same views on abortion, masked mandates and CRT


Red states are getting redder and blue bluer: Politically polarized Americans are moving to states that reflect their own views on abortion, mask mandates and CRT

  • A Redfin survey found that more Americans will vote with their feet in 2022
  • A look at its Los Angeles users revealed 25% of those moving kept to blue states while nearly 10 per cent decided to go red
  • Redfin predicts mask and vaccine mandates and critical race theory will lead to greater polarization between states and even local neighborhoods 


Americans have started factoring a state’s political ideology into their decision to move as the nation grows increasingly polarized.

A survey from Redfin, a real-estate brokerage firm based in Seattle, predicted more people would vote with their feet in 2022, moving to states that align with their political beliefs about abortion, civil rights, mask mandates and critical race theory

‘Now that workers have more control over where they live, more people will seek out areas where there are like minded people with laws that fit their political beliefs,’ wrote Daryl Fairweather, chief economist for Redfin. 

‘We will also see more blue enclaves grow within red areas and vice versa, as parents select school districts that align with their preferences regarding mask mandates, critical race theory and other controversial issues.’ 

A Redfin survey found about 25 per cent of its Los Angeles users preferred to stay in a blue state while nearly 10 per cent have chosen to go red in the third quarter of 2021

More and more people are moving to states that have abortion laws that fit their political ideology. Pictured, protests against Texas's six week abortion ban, which was being looked over by the US Supreme Court on November 1

More and more people are moving to states that have abortion laws that fit their political ideology. Pictured, protests against Texas’s six week abortion ban, which was being looked over by the US Supreme Court on November 1  

Redfin predicted that a state's politics around vaccine and masking mandates will become one of the factors Americans consider when moving next year

Redfin predicted that a state’s politics around vaccine and masking mandates will become one of the factors Americans consider when moving next year

Redfin found that of its Los Angeles users who moved in the third quarter of 2021, 25.4 per cent kept to a blue states while nearly 10 per cent moved to red states, with many citing issues like abortion, voting protection laws and civil right laws as one of the reasons they chose to move.   

An October survey of more than 1,000 Redfin users across the nation found that 32 percent of people did not want to live in a place where abortion was fully legal, with nearly have rejecting the idea all together. 

On the opposite side of the political spectrum, 40 per cent said they would prefer to live in a state where abortion is fully legal and accessible, with 12 per cent saying it would be a deal breaker. 

The issue returned to the national spotlight after Texas passed the nation’s strictest anti-abortion law in September, banning abortions after six weeks. The law triggered hundreds of nation-wide protests against the Lone Star state as the US Supreme Court could overrule its Roe v. Wade decision. 

Voter protection and ease of voting became another hot button issue following the heavily polarized 2020 presidential election and the pandemic. 

About 40 percent those surveyed by Redfin said they would want to live in a place where abortion is fully legal, while 32 per cent said they would not like to live in such a place

About 40 percent those surveyed by Redfin said they would want to live in a place where abortion is fully legal, while 32 per cent said they would not like to live in such a place

Over the summer, 17 red states passed new laws making it harder to vote, according to the Brennan Center for Justice, spurred by former President Donald Trump’s debunked claims that voter fraud cost him the election. 

But while some red states passed voter restrictions laws, blue states made voting easier through expanding mail-in voting and even granting felons the right to vote, like in Washington. 

About 55 per cent of those polled said they liked strong voter protection laws that make it easier to accomplish, with 15 per cent saying they would only live in a place like that. 

Eight per cent said they did not want to live in a place that made voting easier, and another 8 per cent said they would prefer not to.  

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