Parents who left California over ‘woke’ curriculum fight to keep critical race theory out of Utah


A couple who left California over the teaching of critical race theory in schools, are now fighting to keep the topic off the curriculum in Utah.

Gloria and Oscar Vindas said they began homeschooling their son in California due to the teaching of the subject in schools.

The curriculum was ‘one of the main reasons’ they chose to relocate to Utah, where they were shocked to find that it was also taught in schools.

Critical race theory examines the influence of race and racism on America’s laws, politics and culture, taking into consideration issues such as white supremacy and institutionalized racism.

Its place in schools has become a hot button issue, with supporters of its inclusion in curricula arguing it will eventually help lead to a fairer society, and detractors saying it is inherently divisive.

Speaking to Fox News, Gloria Vindas claimed that critical race theory was rooted in Marxism and said she was concerned about where teaching the subject might lead.

‘I’ve taught my son against that [Marxism], so I’d have to say my biggest fear is where this leads.

‘I think when critical race theory is first presented – it can be presented in a lot of ways at school – and it can sound really good in the beginning but the more you go in and follow it, the more divisive it becomes.’

A couple who left California over the teaching of critical race theory in schools, is now fighting to keep the topic off the curriculum in Utah. Gloria (left) and Oscar Vindas said the teaching of the subject in schools was ‘one of the main reasons’ they chose to relocate to Utah, where they were shocked to find that it was also taught in schools

Gloria said she had been homeschooling her 16-year-old son since the seventh grade ‘due to common core and critical race theory in California.’

‘I pulled him out and I was excited to put him in here [in Utah],’ she said.

However, after talking to locals and doing some research, Gloria said she found the teaching of critical race theory was even more prevalent in Utah than it had been in California. 

Her husband, Oscar, questioned whether school was an appropriate place for children to learn about race and racism.

‘To be taught racism in schools is pretty harsh, I mean these kids are going to school to learn and they should be learning basic math, reading – learning skills – not being taught, you know, “just because of the color of your skin, you’re a racist,'” he said.

‘I think it’s very important to separate those things when you’re teaching children.’ 

The couple’s interview came after Gloria addressed the board of the Canyons School District on Tuesday on behalf of Utah Parents United, an advocacy group.

‘Teaching on multiculturalism and respecting different cultures is one thing, but teaching that our Caucasian brothers and sisters are systemically racist because of the way they were born is also racist,’ Gloria said in her speech, asking the board not to teach critical race theory.

The couple's interview came after Gloria addressed the board of the Canyons School District on Tuesday on behalf of Utah Parents United, an advocacy group

The couple’s interview came after Gloria addressed the board of the Canyons School District on Tuesday on behalf of Utah Parents United, an advocacy group

Gloria told Fox that officials in Utah don’t listen to parents concerns over what their children are being taught in schools.

‘What’s shocking is Utah is mirroring the education system of California, and I would say it’s probably the most progressive in the Western states when it comes to critical race theory and the school board are not listening to any parents – they just refuse to listen – and that’s what we found in California, which was one of the main reasons we decided to move here.  

‘So I’m concerned because it’s creating an environment here in Utah that’s creating more divide and I blame the officials at the top here in Utah,’ she said.

In response to Tuesday’s discussion on the teaching of critical race theory, the Utah Board of Education said curriculum was governed by each district.

Canyons School District spokesman Jeff Haney told KJZZ that critical race theory is not part of the district’s curriculum and there are no plans to incorporate it into teaching. 

‘I found that they don’t call it the collegiate-level curriculum of critical race theory here but it is still being taught in the Utah education system and, if anything, I would say it’s actually more than the California education system,’ Gloria told Fox.  

Salt Lake Education Foundation Director James Yapias, whose organisation works with schools in Salt Lake City School District, told KUTV on Tuesday:  

‘It’s not about learning about someone’s specific culture, it’s more about the understanding of its history. Teachers are allowed to teach history, but also I think they should be able to tell the full story of everyone’s contribution to this country.’    

Critical race theory’s place in schools is a divisive issue in several states, where parents and teachers have raised concerns about its inclusion in curricula.

On Tuesday, a multimillionaire businessman hoping to become the first Republican governor of Virginia in over a decade accused the state of derailing children’s education, in an effort to become more ‘woke’.

Republican gubernatorial candidate Glenn Youngkin has accused Virginia of derailing children's education, in an effort to become more 'woke'

Republican gubernatorial candidate Glenn Youngkin has accused Virginia of derailing children’s education, in an effort to become more ‘woke’

Glenn Youngkin, 54, appeared on Tucker Carlson’s Fox News show on Tuesday to blast a proposal to remove advanced and remedial math classes in state schools while at the same time introducing lessons on critical race theory.

‘In education, they want to teach our kids what to think,’ said Youngkin.

‘They want to teach them critical race theory and they want to take accelerated math out of the curriculum.

‘I want to teach our kids how to think and not have critical race theory in the curriculum, and actually yes, teach accelerated math.’

This week, a father spoke out about pulling his daughter out of her $43,000-per-year New York City school, saying other parents should follow suit. 

Harvey Goldman took his nine-year-old out of Heschel School, a Jewish day school on the Upper West Side, because he felt its curriculum ‘teaches children to feel bad about the color of their skin’.

‘They are teaching these kids terrible things,’ he said on Tuesday. ‘Teaching them to feel bad about themselves and it is really awful.’ 

Goldman and his family moved to Florida after learning that the fourth-grader was being tutored on her ‘white privilege’.

On Tuesday night, he told Fox News that other parents had gotten in touch with him to seek advice, and he recommended they follow suit.

Harvey Goldman took his nine-year-old out of Heschel School, a Jewish day school on the Upper West Side, because he felt its curriculum 'teaches children to feel bad about the color of their skin'

Harvey Goldman took his nine-year-old out of Heschel School, a Jewish day school on the Upper West Side, because he felt its curriculum ‘teaches children to feel bad about the color of their skin’ 

Meanwhile, in Texas, candidates opposed to teaching critical race theory in the classroom swept a local school board election, following a bitterly contested campaign that saw passions rise on both sides.

In Saturday’s election in Southlake, candidates opposed to the new curriculum won the two open seats on the Carroll Independent School District board overwhelmingly, with nearly 70 percent of the vote.

The election followed a harsh dispute over plans the district introduced last summer to require diversity and inclusion training after a video went viral showing some of its high school students laughing as they shouted a racial slur.

Parents packed school board meetings to oppose the plan, arguing it would create ‘diversity police’ and discriminate against white children. 

In Saturday's election in Southlake, Texas, candidates opposed to 'critical race theory' won the two open seats on the Carroll Independent School District board overwhelmingly

In Saturday’s election in Southlake, Texas, candidates opposed to ‘critical race theory’ won the two open seats on the Carroll Independent School District board overwhelmingly

Some even pulled their kids out of the district, and one mother sued, pausing the plan’s implementation.  

In Saturday’s election, the result was a landslide, with candidates backed by the conservative Southlake Families PAC winning every race by a nearly 40-point margin, according to Southlake Style

Voter turnout for the election shattered participation records for a local race in Southlake. 

The results, which came amid a national debate about lessons on race in the classroom, were as a victory for parents who view critical race theory (CRT) as damaging and divisive. 

But the outcome was a bitter disappointment for those who view CRT as vital to fighting racism.



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