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Osher Günsberg opens up about his anxiety and OCD to his old radio co-hosts


The Bachelor’s Osher Günsberg recalls how difficult it was hosting breakfast radio while on ‘heavy drugs’ as he speaks about his anxiety and obsessive compulsive disorder


Osher Günsberg has talked openly about his mental health struggles and how he was a changed person when he was on ‘heavy drugs’.

The Bachelor host spoke about the difficult time with his old radio co-hosts, Matty Acton, Abby Coleman and Stav Davidson, as his SBS documentary on suicide in Australia, titled Osher Günsberg: A Matter of Life and Death, airs later this month.

The 47-year-old, who suffers from anxiety and obsessive compulsive disorder, said he found it really hard to form emotional relationships while he was heavily medicated. 

Struggles: The Bachelor’s Osher Günsberg has recalled how difficult it was hosting breakfast radio while on ‘heavy drugs’ while speaking about his anxiety and obsessive compulsive disorder 

‘You guys knew me when I was on a whole lot of meds,’ Osher said during an interview on B105 FM’s Stav, Abby and Matt on Friday.

‘Remember when I told you that I had to come off the meds and I might be a bit weird for a week?’

‘It was so hard for you,’ replied Abby. ‘I found it hard when you were on medication. I found it really hard to connect with you. You were just so disconnected from your emotions.’

The reality TV host explained that he ‘needed to be on those heavy drugs’, but acknowledged there are ‘benefits and side effects’ when it comes to taking medication for mental health issues. 

Open: The Bachelor host spoke about the difficult time with his old radio co-hosts, Matty Acton, Abby Coleman (right) and Stav Davidson (left), as his SBS documentary on suicide in Australia, titled Osher Günsberg: A Matter of Life and Death, airs later this month.

Open: The Bachelor host spoke about the difficult time with his old radio co-hosts, Matty Acton, Abby Coleman (right) and Stav Davidson (left), as his SBS documentary on suicide in Australia, titled Osher Günsberg: A Matter of Life and Death, airs later this month.

‘It made it difficult for me to form emotional relationships. I know that Abby, I know that was hard,’ he continued, before reflecting on the times he went off his medication. 

‘The thing is guys – I couldn’t bear it. It was like running your motorbike in the red. I couldn’t be with that level of isolation of my head and, as I came back on my new meds, it was a lot better.’ 

Osher stated that ‘people have different brains’ and those who struggle with mental health need to be on and off different medication.

'I couldn't be with that level of isolation of my head': Osher reflected on the times he went off his medication. Pictured here with Australian Idol co-host James Mathieson

‘I couldn’t be with that level of isolation of my head’: Osher reflected on the times he went off his medication. Pictured here with Australian Idol co-host James Mathieson 

The TV star revealed this was the main reason he decided to do the documentary in the first place. 

‘This is just another thing that happens for people in our community and it’s no big deal,’ he added.

‘There’s solutions out there, and as long as we treat it like a problem to be solved it’s fine. ‘

Osher Günsberg: A Matter of Life and Death premieres at 8:30pm on Sunday the 19th September on SBS.

Coming soon: Osher Günsberg: A Matter of Life and Death premieres at 8:30pm on Sunday the 19th September on SBS

Coming soon: Osher Günsberg: A Matter of Life and Death premieres at 8:30pm on Sunday the 19th September on SBS

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