Entertainment

Norman Lloyd, star of St. Elsewhere and Dead Poets Society and much more, passed away at 106


The Hollywood community is mourning a legend as actor and filmmaker Norman Lloyd has passed away at 106 years of age.

The beloved star of St. Elsewhere, Dead Poets Society, and, most recently, the 2015 comedy Trainwreck, passed away in his sleep on Monday, a family friend confirmed to Deadline on Tuesday. 

Lloyd worked with legendary filmmakers such as Orseon Welles and Stanley Kubrick while starring alongside Charlie Chaplin and so many more in a career that spanned decades.

Mourning: The Hollywood community is mourning a legend as actor and filmmaker Norman Lloyd has passed away at 106 years of age

Lloyd was born Norman Perlmutter on November 8, 1914 in Jersey City, New Jersey, though he was raised in Brooklyn.

He graduated high school at just 15 years of age and at 17, he became the youngest apprentice to director May Sarton at Eva Le Gallienne’s Civic Repertory Theatre in New York City.

He became a stage actor in the 1930s and joined a company called Theatre of Action, where he met his wife Peggy Craven, who he married in 1936 until her death in 2011. 

Early days: Lloyd was born Norman Perlmutter on November 8, 1914 in Jersey City, New Jersey, though he was raised in Brooklyn

Early days: Lloyd was born Norman Perlmutter on November 8, 1914 in Jersey City, New Jersey, though he was raised in Brooklyn

His first TV role was in the 1939 TV movie The Streets of New York, before making a memorable big-screen debut in Alfred Hitchcock’s 1942 film Saboteur. 

That lead to a slew of roles in The Unseen, Within These Walls, Spellbound, A Walk In the Sun and No Minor Vices. 

He reunited with Hitchcock on the small screen in Alfred Hitchcock Presents in 1957, which helped resurrect his career after he couldn’t find work for years due to the Hollywood blacklist era aimed at communists and sympathizers.

Saboteur: His first TV role was in the 1939 TV movie The Streets of New York, before making a memorable big-screen debut in Alfred Hitchcock's 1942 film Saboteur

Saboteur: His first TV role was in the 1939 TV movie The Streets of New York, before making a memorable big-screen debut in Alfred Hitchcock’s 1942 film Saboteur

Vices: That lead to a slew of roles in The Unseen, Within These Walls, Spellbound, A Walk In the Sun and No Minor Vices (above)

Vices: That lead to a slew of roles in The Unseen, Within These Walls, Spellbound, A Walk In the Sun and No Minor Vices (above)

He would go on to star on the small screen in the NBC drama series St. Elsewhere, which ran from 1982 to 1988.

He played Dr. Daniel Auschlander, a calming presence at St. Eligius hospital, who was originally only supposed to appear in a few episodes.

Lloyd became a series regular and stayed with the show for the entire run, which would ultimately inspired medical dramas such as E.R. and Grey´s Anatomy.

Elsewhere: He would go on to star on the small screen in the NBC drama series St. Elsewhere, which ran from 1982 to 1988

Elsewhere: He would go on to star on the small screen in the NBC drama series St. Elsewhere, which ran from 1982 to 1988

His other memorable roles include Mr. Letterblair in Martin Scorsese’s The Age of Innocence, A Place For Heroes and Trainwreck.

His other TV credits include roles in Star Trek: The Next Generation, Murder, She Wrote, The Paper Chase, Quincy M.E., Kojak and The Practice.

In 2014, in recognition of his 82 years in show business, and reaching the age of 100, the Los Angeles City Council proclaimed that his birthday of Nov. 8, would be honored as “Norman Lloyd Day.”

Age of Innocence: His other memorable roles include Mr. Letterblair in Martin Scorsese's The Age of Innocence, A Place For Heroes and Trainwreck

Age of Innocence: His other memorable roles include Mr. Letterblair in Martin Scorsese’s The Age of Innocence, A Place For Heroes and Trainwreck

Recognition: In 2014, in recognition of his 82 years in show business, and reaching the age of 100, the Los Angeles City Council proclaimed that his birthday of Nov. 8, would be honored as "Norman Lloyd Day"

Recognition: In 2014, in recognition of his 82 years in show business, and reaching the age of 100, the Los Angeles City Council proclaimed that his birthday of Nov. 8, would be honored as “Norman Lloyd Day”



Source link

Related Articles

Back to top button