Native Americans want to meet Harry and Meghan over fears they are using HOLY WATER to water garden


A group of Native Americans have invited Prince Harry and Meghan Markle to meet over their fears the Sussexes are using holy water to irrigate the grounds of their California mansion. 

The couple’s $14.7 million luxury complex is built on land that once belonged to the Chumash people, a tribe which have roots in the area dating back nearly 11,000 years. 

A number of homes in the area of Montecito use the water from the area’s vast number of hot and cold springs and underground rivers.

But the Chumash tribe leader Eleanor Fishburn, 60, said the water, which her people view as holy, should not be use to water their gardens, reports The Sun

The couple’s $14.7 million luxury complex is built on land that once belonged to the Chumash people, a tribe which have roots in the area dating back nearly 11,000 years

A group of Native Americans have invited Prince Harry and Meghan Markle to meet over fears the Sussexes are using holy water to irrigate the grounds of their California mansion

A group of Native Americans have invited Prince Harry and Meghan Markle to meet over fears the Sussexes are using holy water to irrigate the grounds of their California mansion

The Chumash tribe say that the hot and cold springs and underground water are, for them, their holy water. Pictured: Members of the Chumash Tribe

The Chumash tribe say that the hot and cold springs and underground water are, for them, their holy water. Pictured: Members of the Chumash Tribe

Pictured: Tribe leader Eleanor Fishburn, who would like to meet Harry and Meghan because she says the Chumash would be unhappy if water from the local springs was being used to water gardens

Pictured: Tribe leader Eleanor Fishburn, who would like to meet Harry and Meghan because she says the Chumash would be unhappy if water from the local springs was being used to water gardens

She said: ‘For us, this water is a pure water, a holy water and a ceremonial water.

‘As a native population, it is sacred for us and the idea that people in the area are using water from springs to water their gardens is something that doesn’t sit well with us.’

Eleanor, the leader of the Chumash tribe’s Barbareno-Ventura branch, said she had invited Prince Harry and Meghan to a meeting to discuss alternatives as well as explain the tribe’s history. 

She explained: ‘It would be great if they came so we could explain our history and culture and let them know about how sacred the water is to us. 

Last month, the human remains of a ‘young adult’ believed to be from the Chumash tribe, was unearthed on a road just yards away from Harry and Meghan’s mansion in Montecito.    

The bones were found on May 24 on a road in Montecito which neighbors the street of the couple’s home, according to a Santa Barbara Sheriff’s office spokeswoman.

A number of homes in the area of Montecito use the water from the area's vast number of hot and cold springs and underground rivers. Pictured: Hot Springs Creek in Montecito

A number of homes in the area of Montecito use the water from the area’s vast number of hot and cold springs and underground rivers. Pictured: Hot Springs Creek in Montecito

Human remains were found on a property yards away from Meghan and Harry's $14.7 million mansion in Montecito, California, local sheriff officials confirmed

Human remains were found on a property yards away from Meghan and Harry’s $14.7 million mansion in Montecito, California, local sheriff officials confirmed

They were reportedly uncovered during landscaping construction, the spokeswoman said, and the sheriff’s office had recruited the help of a forensic anthropologist to investigate their true origins.

Early reports indicate that the remains, which were found around three feet deep, could be from the Chumash people, which have roots in the area dating back nearly 11,000 years.

Work was stopped at the site, and the Santa Barbara sheriff’s office said it was in communication with the local Native American commission to determine the next steps pending the result of the forensic anthropologist’s investigation.

Officials could not confirm whether the bones are Chumash in origin, but that it was likely, ‘because we live in that area,’ the spokeswoman said.

The Chumash made contact with the first Spanish European settlers in the area in 1542, and Spain would settle the area in 1770 causing a great upheaval for the natives. 

Today there are 5,000 Chumash members remaining and the tribe said they still thrive despite centuries of hardship and abuse

Today there are 5,000 Chumash members remaining and the tribe said they still thrive despite centuries of hardship and abuse

Mexico would seize the area in 1834 causing further disruption, driving even more Chumash off the land before America seized the area for itself in 1848.

In 1855 a piece of land was set aside in the area for the remaining 100 Chumash known to live there, with an official reservation established in 1901. 

Today there are an estimated 5,000 Chumash members and the tribe said they still thrive despite centuries of hardship and abuse.

Last year, Harry and Meghan said the history of the Commonwealth and colonisation ‘must be acknowledged’, even if it’s ‘uncomfortable’.

During a video call with young leaders from the Queen’s Commonwealth Trust, Harry said the Commonwealth needs to follow others who have ‘acknowledged the past’ and are ‘trying to right their wrongs’, and also admitted to having his own ‘unconscious bias’.

Meanwhile Meghan said it is also a time of ‘reckoning’ when individuals should be putting their hands up to ‘own’ their past wrongdoings’. 

Prince Harry risked upsetting the royal family by insisting the Commonwealth 'must acknowledge the past' in a video call with Meghan Markle and young leaders from across the Commonwealth. Pictured, Chrisann Jarrett (UK) (top left), Mike Omoniyi (UK), (top right), Alicia Wallace (Bahamas) (bottom left) and Abdullahi Alim (Australia) (bottom right)

Prince Harry risked upsetting the royal family by insisting the Commonwealth ‘must acknowledge the past’ in a video call with Meghan Markle and young leaders from across the Commonwealth. Pictured, Chrisann Jarrett (UK) (top left), Mike Omoniyi (UK), (top right), Alicia Wallace (Bahamas) (bottom left) and Abdullahi Alim (Australia) (bottom right)

Speaking from his Los Angeles home, Harry, whose grandmother the Queen is head of the Commonwealth, said: ‘When you look across the Commonwealth, there is no way that we can move forward unless we acknowledge the past. 

‘So many people have done such an incredible job of acknowledging the past and trying to right those wrongs, but I think we all acknowledge there is so much more still to do.’ 

The statement appears to be a swipe at the British Empire, which was ruled over by his ancestors and led to the creation of the Commonwealth.



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