Mississippi governor claims state is not scared of Covid because people believe in ‘eternal life’


Mississippi Governor Tate Reeves has claimed that people living in the state are ‘less scared’ of COVID-19 because they believe in ‘eternal life’ – despite a surge in new infections and hospitalizations. 

Reeves delivered his remarks to a group of Republicans at a fundraiser event in Eads, Tennessee, last Thursday, according to the Daily Memphian.

‘I’m often asked by some of my friends on the other side of the aisle about COVID … and why does it seem like folks in Mississippi and maybe in the Mid-South are a little less scared, shall we say,’ Reeves said.

‘When you believe in eternal life — when you believe that living on this earth is but a blip on the screen, then you don’t have to be so scared of things,’ he said.

Reeves added, ‘God also tells us to take necessary precautions. And we all have opportunities and abilities to do that and we should all do that. I encourage everyone to do so.’ 

Governor Tate Reeves (pictured) point out that people in the state were ‘less scared’ of COVID-19 because they believe in ‘eternal life,’ as infections and hospitalizations reach new record levels

COVID-19 cases in Mississippi between April 2020 and July 2021: As of August 28, Mississippi has registered 2712,75 positive cases. The highest one-day total was recorded on August 22, when a record high 5,048 new cases were reported

COVID-19 cases in Mississippi between April 2020 and July 2021: As of August 28, Mississippi has registered 2712,75 positive cases. The highest one-day total was recorded on August 22, when a record high 5,048 new cases were reported

Mississippi COVID-19 cases and deaths as of August 29 report that their have been 151 deaths within the last seven days, making it one of the hardest hit states in the country

Mississippi COVID-19 cases and deaths as of August 29 report that their have been 151 deaths within the last seven days, making it one of the hardest hit states in the country

Mississippi has the second lowest vaccinations rates in the US, with 38% of the population being fully vaccinated. Only Alabama is worse.

The Magnolia State also has recorded 25,102 cases in the last week, compared to 22,998 the week before, according to Johns Hopkins University.

Deaths are also up in the state to 230 in the last seven days, from 140 a week earlier.

On Friday, Mississippi recorded 4,041 new cases of COVID-19 and 13 deaths 

State health officials are at a breaking point as 93 percent of the state’s ICU beds are full and 63 percent in use by COVID-19 patients, according to data from the Department of Health and Human Services. 

At some hospitals, tents have had to be set up in parking garages to deal with the overflow of patients.

 

Hospitals in Mississippi are running out of beds for patients to the point that tents have to be set up in parking garages. Pictured: a staff member walks out of one of four wards that are part of the 32-bed Samaritan's Purse Emergency Field Hospital set up in one of the University of Mississippi Medical Center's parking garages

Hospitals in Mississippi are running out of beds for patients to the point that tents have to be set up in parking garages. Pictured: a staff member walks out of one of four wards that are part of the 32-bed Samaritan’s Purse Emergency Field Hospital set up in one of the University of Mississippi Medical Center’s parking garages

State health officials are at a breaking point as 93 percent of the state's ICU beds are full and 63 percent in use by COVID-19 patients. Pictured: staff set up portable beds that are part of the 32-bed Samaritan's Purse Emergency Field Hospital at the University of Mississippi's Medical Center parking garage

State health officials are at a breaking point as 93 percent of the state’s ICU beds are full and 63 percent in use by COVID-19 patients. Pictured: staff set up portable beds that are part of the 32-bed Samaritan’s Purse Emergency Field Hospital at the University of Mississippi’s Medical Center parking garage

Reeves, who has refused to put in place a mask mandates in schools, has previously criticized measures to slow the spread of the virus that were issued by public health officials.

In July, Reeves told his supporters that the CDC’s new measure to wear masks indoors in order to help reduce transmission ‘reeks of political panic so as to appear they are in control,’ the Associated Press reported.  

A fortnight ago, the Mississippi State Department of Health announced an order telling all state residents infected with COVID-19 to isolate for ten days or possibly face up to five years in prison.

The order, issued by State Health Officer Dr Thomas Hobbs, asked Mississippians to ‘immediately home-isolate on first knowledge of infection with COVID-19,’ regardless of vaccination status.  

Individuals who are caught defying the order’s rules will be fined $500 and might face imprisonment for six months.

If a life-threatening situation is involved, then a person’s ‘failure or refusal to obey the lawful order of a health officer is a felony, punishable by a fine of up to $5,000 or imprisonment for up to five years or both.’   

From the start of the pandemic, the Mississippi has recorded 427,640 cases and 8,2790 COVID-19 related deaths, according to Johns Hopkins University.



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