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Mike Tyson says he IS vaccinated, but only got the COVID-19 shot because he travels for a living


Mike Tyson says he IS vaccinated, but only got the COVID-19 shot because he travels for a living: ‘I didn’t do it willingly’

  • Mike Tyson said he is vaccinated, but only got the shot out of necessity
  • The 55-year-old has a cannabis company and also makes public appearances, which means he has to travel and, he said, that is why he got the vaccine 
  • The former champion suspects he previously had COVID-19 but isn’t sure
  • The US death toll from COVID-19 eclipsed 700,000 late Friday 
  • The last 100,000 deaths occurred after vaccines were made readily available


Mike Tyson is vaccinated against COVID-19, but the former heavyweight champion boxer only did so out of necessity.

‘I didn’t do it willingly,’ Tyson told USA Today. ‘I’m a little apprehensive of that. I was pretty much beaten into submission to do this because I travel internationally. And if I don’t travel, we don’t eat.’

Tyson spoke to USA Today from the headquarters of his cannabis company, which is one of several businesses in which he’s involved. He also regularly makes public appearances. 

Mike Tyson, 55, is vaccinated against COVID-19 , but the former heavyweight champion boxer only did so out of necessity

‘So I decided to take the risk and take the shot,’ Tyson continued. ‘And people, they have their own choice. I never got sick.’

The 55-year-old may have previously had COVID-19, he said, but is not sure.

‘I was coughing a lot and I was in this place with a lot of people,’ he said. ‘The whole day I was just coughing, throwing up water, so I was dehydrated.’

The symptoms ultimately subsided.

‘I might have caught it, but I feel great now,’ he said. ‘I really feel well. The best I ever felt.’

Mike Tyson poses in the locker room after his exhibition against Roy Jones Jr. at the Staples Center in Los Angeles last November

Mike Tyson poses in the locker room after his exhibition against Roy Jones Jr. at the Staples Center in Los Angeles last November

Tyson has not competed since last November, when he went eight full rounds with Roy Jones Jr. in a lackluster exhibition.

The US death toll from COVID-19 eclipsed 700,000 late Friday — a number greater than the population of Boston. The last 100,000 deaths occurred during a time when vaccines — which overwhelmingly prevent deaths, hospitalizations and serious illness — were available to any American over the age of 12.

The milestone is deeply frustrating to doctors, public health officials and the American public, who watched a pandemic that had been easing earlier in the summer take a dark turn. Tens of millions of Americans have refused to get vaccinated, allowing the highly contagious delta variant to tear through the country and send the death toll from 600,000 to 700,000 in 3 1/2 months.

Florida suffered by far the most death of any state during that period, with the virus killing about 17,000 residents since the middle of June. Texas was second with 13,000 deaths. The two states account for 15 percent of the country’s population, but more than 30 percent of the nation’s deaths since the nation crossed the 600,000 threshold.

Arguably Tyson's most famous knockout, Tyson is seen dropping Trevor Berbick in 1986

Arguably Tyson’s most famous knockout, Tyson is seen dropping Trevor Berbick in 1986

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