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Michael Cohen suggests his seven meetings with Manhattan DA’s office ‘aren’t good news’ for Trump


Michael Cohen has suggested that his multiple meetings with the Manhattan District Attorney’s office ‘aren’t good news’ for Donald Trump.  

The former president’s ex fixer and lawyer shared a tweet that quoted US attorney Joyce Vance and linked to an article in which she told MSNBC: ‘He [Cohen] can help…them understand transactions that may have been criminal conduct.’

Vance – no relation to Manhattan DA Cyrus Vance – added: ‘The fact that he’s been there seven times and is rumored to be going back for an eighth time is not good news for Trump.’ 

Cohen has reportedly met with prosecutors for seven interviews in a sweeping investigation into alleged financial crimes by the Trump Organization. The former fixer is viewed as a key witness in the probe. 

Joyce Vance said Saturday: ‘He may have been around a lot of the transactions, he may be able to look at the underlying taxes and tell them who was in the room. 

‘He can help guide them to the best evidence and help them understand transactions that may have been criminal conduct,’ the legal expert added.  

Cohen is currently in home confinement serving a three-year sentence on charges related to payoffs he made during the 2016 presidential race to buy the silence of two women who alleged they had affairs with Trump. 

He tweeted Friday: ‘I have total confidence, and so should everyone, in CY Vance, @ManhattanDA Mark Pomerantz and the entire team.’ 

Michael Cohen, pictured last week, has suggested that his multiple meetings with the Manhattan District Attorney’s office ‘aren’t good news’ for Donald Trump

The former president's ex fixer and lawyer shared a tweet which quoted US attorney Joyce Vance and linked to an article in which she told MSNBC: 'He [Cohen] can help...them understand transactions that may have been criminal conduct'

The former president’s ex fixer and lawyer shared a tweet which quoted US attorney Joyce Vance and linked to an article in which she told MSNBC: ‘He [Cohen] can help…them understand transactions that may have been criminal conduct’

Vance’s office opened its investigation into the alleged hush-money payments in 2018. 

The probe has since expanded to include Trump’s conduct as a private business owner and whether the Trump Organization engaged in criminal tax evasion among other charges.

Cohen spoke to Reuters outside his Manhattan apartment on Wednesday prior to his seventh meeting with investigators. 

He likened a March 1 Supreme Court decision denying Trump’s last-ditch effort to keep his tax records private to the ‘holy grail’ for Vance’s investigation. 

After that ruling, Vance’s office obtained millions of pages of records from Trump’s accountants at Mazars USA LLP, including tax returns and the business records on which they are based, and communications between the Trump Organization and its accountants.      

The Manhattan district attorney said in an August filing that the office is investigating ‘possibly extensive and protracted criminal conduct’ at the Trump Organization, though he has not fully disclosed the scope of the probe. 

In a September filing, he said ‘mountainous’ misconduct allegations could justify a grand jury probe into possible tax fraud, insurance fraud and falsification of business records.

The Trump Organization has denied wrongdoing in court filings while Trump maintains that the investigations are politically motivated. 

Cohen has reportedly met with prosecutors for seven interviews in a sweeping investigation into alleged financial crimes by the Trump Organization. The former fixer is viewed as a key witness in the probe. Trump is pictured golfing at Trump International Golf Course in West Palm Beach, Florida after returning from his trip to New York City

Cohen has reportedly met with prosecutors for seven interviews in a sweeping investigation into alleged financial crimes by the Trump Organization. The former fixer is viewed as a key witness in the probe. Trump is pictured golfing at Trump International Golf Course in West Palm Beach, Florida after returning from his trip to New York City

But Watergate whistleblower John Dean on Wednesday predicted that Trump will be indicted within a matter of days.  

Dean, who delivered pivotal testimony in 1973 that helped cause Nixon to resign after the Watergate scandal, shared his prediction via Twitter. 

Trump made a 48-hour visit to his former hometown of New York City earlier this month to ‘look under the hood’ of his family firm amid the Vance investigation. 

Aides were seen packing up boxes of files at his Manhattan skyscraper so he could bring them back to his new home in Palm Beach, Florida. 

The investigation then spread to Chicago when Vance subpoenaed documents from a company that invested in a skyscraper built by the former president in the Windy City. 

The inquiry – one of several involving the former president – poses the biggest current legal threat to Trump. 

Trump had retained an ownership stake in the Trump Organization throughout his presidency but the day-to-day management was handed over to his two eldest sons Donald Trump Jr and Eric.

The real estate and hospitality business remained headquartered in Trump Tower through his presidency. 

It was not immediately clear whom Trump met with while holed up in his Manhattan residence.         

Joyce Vance said Saturday: 'He [Cohen] can help guide them to the best evidence and help them understand transactions that may have been criminal conduct,' the legal expert added'

Joyce Vance said Saturday: ‘He [Cohen] can help guide them to the best evidence and help them understand transactions that may have been criminal conduct,’ the legal expert added’

Manhattan DA Cyrus Vance, pictured, said last Friday he will not seek re-election in November

Manhattan DA Cyrus Vance, pictured, said last Friday he will not seek re-election in November

Manhattan DA Vance said last Friday he will not seek re-election in November, making it likely that his criminal investigation into Trump will be left for his successor.

The decision by Vance, 66, not to seek a fourth term raises questions about the potential timing for the probe into Trump, who, if indicted, would be the first former president to face criminal prosecution.

That probe has accelerated since Republican Trump lost his bid for a second term to President Joe Biden.  

At least nine candidates have said they want to succeed Vance, who won his first term in 2009. Vance gave no specific reason for his decision not to run again. 

‘I never imagined myself as District Attorney for decades like my predecessors,’ he said in a statement. He had succeeded Robert Morgenthau, who over 35 years made the office a major crime-fighting agency in the country.

Vance has overseen many high-profile cases, including last year’s conviction of Hollywood film producer Harvey Weinstein on rape and sexual assault charges.

Trump is also being investigated in Georgia for allegedly trying to overturn that state’s 2020 election results, a step that could lead to a criminal investigation by state and local authorities.



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