Massachusetts cops used a sonic blast to disable Rise of the Moors suspects during 11-hour stand-off


A Massachusetts police chief said officers used a sonic boom to disable Rise of the Moors suspects, helping authorities apprehend 11 armed men on Interstate 95 during an hours-long standoff on July 3. 

The group of armed individuals, who identify as Moorish Americans and collectively as Rise of the Moors, were refueling gas tanks at 1.30am with their own fuel and told law enforcement that they were traveling from Rhode Island to Maine for ‘training.’ 

When police asked them to drop their weapons, they refused, resulting in an 11-hour stand-off.  

Wakefield Police Chief Steven Skory told a local town council meeting that officers deployed a high pitch alarm is known as an LRAD, which Skory describes as an ‘audible alarm that basically disables someone temporarily’ during the stand-off, finally bringing it to an end.

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Wakefield Police Chief Steven Skory told a local town council meeting that officers deployed a high pitch alarm is known as an LRAD, which Skory describes as an ‘audible alarm that basically disables someone temporarily’ during the stand-off, finally bringing it to an end

A Massachusetts police chief said officers used a sonic boom to disable Rise of the Moors suspects, helping authorities apprehend 11 armed men on Interstate 95 during an hours -long standoff on July 3 (pictured is footage from police body cam)

A Massachusetts police chief said officers used a sonic boom to disable Rise of the Moors suspects, helping authorities apprehend 11 armed men on Interstate 95 during an hours -long standoff on July 3 (pictured is footage from police body cam) 

A Massachusetts State Police trooper saw two cars with their hazard lights on parked on the shoulder of Interstate-95, near the town of Wakefield, around 1:30 a.m. The group of heavily armed men were refilling gas tanks with their own fuel and told law enforcement that they were headed to Maine for 'training'

A Massachusetts State Police trooper saw two cars with their hazard lights on parked on the shoulder of Interstate-95, near the town of Wakefield, around 1:30 a.m. The group of heavily armed men were refilling gas tanks with their own fuel and told law enforcement that they were headed to Maine for ‘training’

Jahmal Latimer also known as 'Talib Abdulla Bey' cofounded the militia group which claims to be a non-profit educational group based out of Rhode Island. He identifies himself on the group webpage as the chief of the 'Rhode Island State Republic and Providence Plantations'

Jahmal Latimer also known as ‘Talib Abdulla Bey’ cofounded the militia group which claims to be a non-profit educational group based out of Rhode Island. He identifies himself on the group webpage as the chief of the ‘Rhode Island State Republic and Providence Plantations’

According to Skory, when the trooper asked members of the group to produce licenses for the firearms, members of the group indicated they weren’t licensed or didn’t have copies of licenses on them.

They then took up the ‘sovereign attitude that they did not have to adhere by our laws,’ Skory said. 

According to the group’s website, Rise of the Moors is based in Pawtucket, Rhoe Island and is one of 25 active anti-governmental sovereign-citizen groups identified by the Southern Poverty Law Center in 2020. 

While the group’s Facebook page has 1,100 followers and a YouTube channel with 17,000 subscribers, the total number of members is unknown.   

Bodycam footage taken by a cop at the scene shows what led up to the standoff.

It begins with a cop pointing a flashlight at the cars as the group’s purported leader Jamhal Tavon Sanders Latimer, 29, also known as Jamhal Talib Abdullah Bey, approaches him.

Militia leader Jamhal Tavon Sanders Latimer, 29, also known as Jamhal Talib Abdullah Bey, told the judge: 'I don't understand how these charges can be brought against me'

Militia leader Jamhal Tavon Sanders Latimer, 29, also known as Jamhal Talib Abdullah Bey, told the judge: ‘I don’t understand how these charges can be brought against me’

Jamhal Talib Abdullah Bey (pictured in the center wearing a turban) poses with fellow members of the Rise of the Moors group in January 2021

Jamhal Talib Abdullah Bey (pictured in the center wearing a turban) poses with fellow members of the Rise of the Moors group in January 2021

The cop questions what the group are doing and Latimer, a former U.S. Marine, says, ‘We’re a local militia from Rhode Island. We’re going to Maine. We weren’t going to be make unnecessary stops. We have fuel in our truck so we can gas up here so that way we could just keep going through.’

The cop asks if they have their licenses and they all say ‘No, we don’t have licenses.’ They again say no when asked if they have any forms of identification.

Asked what they were planning, Latimer says, ‘I have private land in Maine so we’re going up to do some training there.’

What is a LRAD and how does it work? 

Long Range Acoustic Device, (LRAD) is a high-pitched alarm, similar to a car alarm, that can emit a 150-decibel beam of sound.

It has become increasingly as a crowd-control device in the United States and around the world.

It first made headlines in 2009, when police used the device to repel antiglobalization demonstrators protesting the G20 summit in Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania.

The device can also be used to transmit spoken messages across long distance.  

It was developed after the 2000 attack on the ‘USS Cole,’ a U.S. Navy vessel, in Yemen.

Navy crewman had no way of communicating with the passengers or determining their intent, while suicide bombers were able to approach the vessel in a small boat.

According to Robert Putnam, the head of investor and media relations for the LRAD Corporation in San Diego, California, the LRAD is now frequently used at sea and to transmit a targeted message over a large distance.

‘With our largest devices we’re able to reach up to 3.5 kilometers away, over land, water, and almost any type of environment or condition,’ Putnam says.’

 

Latimer agrees to give him personal information and the cop asks for his name, birthday and social security number.

‘I don’t have a social,’ he says and the cop asks, ‘Were you born in the United States?’

Skory told the council that the trooper informed the men, who were dressed in tactical gear and armed with long rifles and handguns, they would likely be arrested.

Eight individuals then retreated into the woods and the regional SWAT team was called in, Skory said. 

Two suspects returned from the woods and were arrested and the perimeter was secured.

When the additional six suspects returned from the woods, police attempted to take them into custody, Skory said. 

In addition to Latimer, those arrested were Robert Rodriguez, 21, Wilfredo Hernandez, 23, Alban El Curraugh, 27, Aaron Lamont Johnson, 29,  Quinn Cumberlander, 40, Lamar Dow, 34, and Conrad Pierre, 29, of Baldwin, New York.  

Following the arrests, police then coordinated with the town’s Department of Public Works to position dump trucks complete with plows on the highway to discourage suspects from attempting to flee, Skory told the council. 

There were no injuries to any officers or suspects, he added.  

Some of the men were arraigned Tuesday and face several charges, including unlawful possession of a firearm and ammunition and the use of body armor in commission of a crime, in connection with the July 3 standoff.

At the arraignment, Latimer told the judge: ‘I don’t understand how these charges can be brought against me.’  

A month before his arrest, Latimer was seen bragging about his firearm arsenal on YouTube.  

Latimer and the Rise of the Moors have a large social media presence, with more than 16,000 subscribers to the group’s YouTube channel, in which the leader posts videos showing off firearms and discussing ‘the constitution.’ 

In June, a New Jersey homeowner got more than she bargained for when a group of Rise of the Moors men broke into her newly-purchased home and claimed it as their ‘ancestral home’.

In a TikTok video that has garnered over 325,000 views, Shanetta Little, 37, or @regblackgrl, describes her bizarre encounter with the extremist group in a 49-part ‘story time’ explanation which ended with a SWAT team being called in.  

During a Town Council meeting, Wakefield Police Chief Steven Skory said officers used a sonic boom to disable Rise of the Moors suspects, helping authorities apprehend 11 armed men on Interstate 95 during an hours -long standoff on July 3

During a Town Council meeting, Wakefield Police Chief Steven Skory said officers used a sonic boom to disable Rise of the Moors suspects, helping authorities apprehend 11 armed men on Interstate 95 during an hours -long standoff on July 3

In the video, Little explains the men broke into her Newark home while she wasn’t there on June 18, sawed off the locks, and changed them. 

She noticed the break-in when she arrived at her home one afternoon to have the gas lines fixed and discovered her keys didn’t work. 

The Rise of The Moors, which flies the Moroccan flag, is centered on the belief that its followers are the ‘aboriginal people’ of the US and takes its teachings partly from a religious sect known as the Moorish Science Temple.

A refusal to acknowledge US laws, belief in UFOs and selling fake passports to pay for their abandoned house HQ: The inside story of the ‘Rise of the Moors’ militia who hit the headlines after stand-off with Massachusetts cops 

Rise of the Moors are a ‘Moorish sovereign citizens’ group whose adherents say they are part of their own sovereign nation and therefore are not subject to any US law.

According to the group’s website, Rise of the Moors is based in Pawtucket, Rhode Island and is one of 25 active antigovernmental sovereign-citizen groups identified by the Southern Poverty Law Center in 2020. 

While the group’s Facebook page has 1,100 followers and a YouTube channel with 17,000 subscribers, the total number of members is unknown. 

Much of the dogma in Rise of the Moors is based in a religious sect known as the Moorish Science Temple. The organization was founded by Noble Drew Ali (born Timothy Drew)  in 1913. Ali taught that all blacks were of Moorish origins but had their Muslim identity taken away from them through slavery and racial segregation. He also encouraged use of the term 'Moor' rather than 'black' in self-identification

The Noble Drew Ali's death caused a schism in the religion over the naming of a rightful successor. The temple eventually divided into three different factions. Rise of the Moors follows the faction led by Brother Edward Mealy El

Much of the dogma in Rise of the Moors is based in a religious sect known as the Moorish Science Temple. The organization was founded by Noble Drew Ali (left) in 1913. The Rise of the Moors pays tribute to the Noble Drew Ali on their website, calling him the ‘first Patriot of the fallen Moors here in America’ as well as the ‘Savior of Humanity.’ They also state that Edward Mealy El (right) is the true successor of Noble Drew Ali, whose death lead to a schism in the religion

Freddy Cruz, a research analyst with the Southern Poverty Law Center told the Washington Post: ‘They have the idea that they have the authority to essentially detach themselves from the United States. So they do things like refusing to pay taxes, get driver’s licenses, or register firearms, and they try to get their members to challenge those federal laws.’   

The Rise of The Moors, which flies the Moroccan flag, is centered on the belief that its followers are the ‘aboriginal people’ of the US and takes its teachings partly from a religious sect known as the Moorish Science Temple, a religious movement that dates back to 1913. 

It wasn’t until the 1990s that the Moorish movement began merging their beliefs with ‘the sovereign citizens movement.’ Sovereign Citizens believe that individual citizens are independent of federal and state governments. Thus was the birth of the ‘Moorish Sovereign Citizens.’       

Some Islamic historians believe that the Moors and Muslim groups reached the Americas before Christopher Columbus.

Moorish sovereigns believe this entitles them to claim immunity from federal, state, and local laws and can sometimes cite God’s law or common law over constitutional authority. 

They come into conflict with federal and state authorities over their refusal to obey laws and government regulations.  

They (like other Moorish sovereign citizen groups), believe in a fictitious 1787 treaty between the United States and Morocco that grants them immunity from US law.

‘There’s no such treaty,’ says Kenneth Gray, a retired FBI Agent who specialized in Counter-Terrorism. ‘It’s bogus. It’s all part of their fraudulent historical claims.’

They use this perceived immunity to justify refusing to pay taxes, buy auto insurance, register their vehicles and to defraud banks and other lending institutions.

Rise of the Moors is just one offshoot of many different types of ‘Moorish Sovereign Citizen’ groups. Most groups tend to be small, with only a couple dozen followers.  

Some Moorish Sovereign Citizen groups believe that Black Moors were the first settlers in the United States and argue that slave ships were a fiction created by white historians to cover up their claim on the land. Others believe that a UFO mothership will soon descend to earth to collect the chosen people (Moors) and return them to their home galaxy.

The Rise of the Moor webpage states in no-uncertain terms: ‘Moors are the organic or original sovereigns of this land — America.’ It continues, ‘When we declare our nationality as Moorish Americans we are taking back the position as the aboriginal people of the land, to which the sovereign power is vested in.’

They believe in the notion that all African-Americans (as well as Dominicans, Haitians and Tainos) were descended from African ‘Moors’ and therefore they do not, and should not ‘identify as black.’  

The temple founded in 1913 that gives the group its Moroccan influences

Much of the dogma in Rise of the Moors is based in a religious sect known as the Moorish Science Temple.

The organization was founded by Noble Drew Ali (born as Timothy Drew) in 1913.

The Rise of the Moors pays tribute to the Noble Drew Ali on their website, calling him the ‘first Patriot of the fallen Moors here in America’ as well as the ‘Savior of Humanity.’

Drew Ali taught that all blacks were of Moorish origins but had their Muslim identity taken away from them through slavery and racial segregation. He also encouraged use of the term ‘Moor’ rather than ‘black’ in self-identification. Many of the group’s formal practices were derived from Muslim observances.

He established new traditions that required all male members of the Temple to wear a fez or turban. They added the suffixes ‘Bey’ or ‘El’ to their last names as a way to signify their Moorish heritage and the new journey as Moorish Americans.

Unlike the Rise of the Moors, most adherents of the Moorish Science Temple are not ‘sovereign citizens’ nor do they shows an interest in paramilitary activity.  

Members of Rise of Moors profit from selling various items through their webpage, such as online courses, e-readers and suspicious-looking financial schemes. One member named Sanchez Bey, hawks clothing apparel that ‘that represents ancient knowledge’ and their ‘dominion and rulership over the universe.’

Another member by the name of Muris Sylfstr Mawal Bey claims to offer customers, ‘the best shoes available online.’ And Delvon al-Lanier Bey, provides ‘Afrocentric-based spiritual and educational training.’

The Rise of the Moors’ clubhouse in Rhode Island was an abandoned home which they acquired through ‘adverse possession.’ The property is owned by Midfirst Bank which has sued the militia group over it, reported the Globe.

Their website explains ‘adverse possession’ as ‘simply taking what’s yours and not waiting for anyone to give it to you.’

‘As an example, our people have been waiting for reoperations, waiting to get access to our resources, waiting for better homes, waiting for better business and waiting for our freedom. Adverse possession puts an end to waiting.’

They threaten to ‘repeat the process’ until ‘every Moorish family has a home and a business.’



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