Larry Elder claims reparations are owed to slave OWNERS who had ‘property stolen’ after Civil War 


Black conservative radio host and politician Larry Elder is arguing in favor of reparations for slavers who had their ‘legal property’ taken away following the Civil War.  

Elder, 69, appeared on The Candace Owens Show, alongside the show’s namesake host, in July to offer his insight on race relations in America.

The topic of reparations was discussed after Owens brought up the abolition of the slave trade, opening dialogue about the logic behind supporting the compensation of former slave owners.

‘When people talk about reparations, do they really want to have that conversation? Like it or not, slavery was legal,’ Elder said. 

‘Their legal property was taken away from them after the Civil War, so you could make an argument that the people that are owed reparations are not only just Black people but also the people whose ‘property’ was taken away after the end of the Civil War.’   

Reparations are often discussed through the lens of providing funds and other resources to black communities – not slave owners – and have been supported by several lawmakers and advocacy groups. 

Black conservative radio host and politician Larry Elder (right) argued in favor of reparations for slavers who had their ‘legal property’ taken away following the Civil War during a July interview with Candace Owens (left)

During the interview, Elder argued that slave owners lost a significant amount of money and resources after the Civil War and the passage of the 13th amendment in 1865 – which partially abolished slavery.

‘You look at the amount of money adjusted for today’s dollars, it’s a great deal of money,’ he said.

He noted that other countries, such as the United Kingdom, ‘compensated slave owners’ with ‘substantial amounts of money’ after they lost their ‘legal property’.

‘That’s why there was no war in the U.K. – the slave owners got substantial amounts of money,’ he said.

U.K. leaders provided former slavers £20million in compensation from the British Slave Compensation Commission after slavery was abolished in the country in 1833, Yahoo News reported.  

During the interview with Owens (pictured), Elder argued that slave owners lost a significant amount of money and resources after the Civil War and the passage of the 13th amendment in 1865

Elder (pictured) noted that other countries, such as the United Kingdom, 'compensated slave owners' with 'substantial amounts of money' after they lost their 'legal property'

During the interview with Owens (left), Elder (right) argued that slave owners lost a significant amount of money and resources after the Civil War and the passage of the 13th amendment in 1865. He noted that other countries, such as the United Kingdom, ‘compensated slave owners’ with ‘substantial amounts of money’ after they lost their ‘legal property’

Elder also argued that racism is not the number one problem the black community is facing, but instead argued that not having a father in the home is far more damaging.

‘A kid today is less likely to be born under a roof with a biological mother and biological father than a kid during slavery,’ he said.

‘In 1965, 25 percent of black kids were born outside of wedlock. Now that number is nearly 70 percent. You cannot blame that on slavery.’ 

He continued: ‘Forget about Larry Elder. Obama said a kid who does not have a father in the house is five times more likely to be poor, nine times more likely to drop out of school, 20 times more likely to end up in jail. It is far and away the number problem.’

Elder’s interview with Owens is making headlines as he campaigns to replace Gov. Gavin Newsom in California’s recall election.

Elder's interview with Owens is making headlines as he campaigns to replace Gov. Gavin Newsom in California's recall election

Elder’s interview with Owens is making headlines as he campaigns to replace Gov. Gavin Newsom in California’s recall election

The radio host is known for repeatedly denouncing the existence of systemic racism, as outlined in a letter he wrote to Congresswoman Maxine Waters (D-CA) earlier this year.

It reads in part: ‘Black leaders refuse to acknowledge the good news: Racism no longer remains a potent threat in American life. Most blacks remain solidly middle class, with blacks forming businesses at a faster rate than whites. The black domestic product, were it a separate country, makes it one of the fifteen wealthiest nations in the world.

‘In America, we see two black Americas. The majority black world reflects increased prosperity, growing homeownership, and steady asset accumulation. The other, the so-called black underclass, remains disturbing. Quite simply, we see too many children having children. It stands, far and away, as America’s No. 1 problem. Whatever role racism played, the complete abolition of white racism would leave these problems unresolved.’ 

He again denounced systemic racism in a 2019 tweet to Twitter CEO Jack Dorsey:

‘Dear @jack, There’s no evidence, let alone ‘widespread’ evidence, of police ‘systemic racism.’ Decades of research find cops MORE HESITANT to use deadly force against blacks than whites. Yet @Blklivesmatter routinely posts the ‘systemic racism’ lie. When will you ban BLM?’ 

The radio host is known for repeatedly denouncing the existence of systemic racism, as evidenced in a tweet to Twitter CEO Jack Dorsey

The radio host is known for repeatedly denouncing the existence of systemic racism, as evidenced in a tweet to Twitter CEO Jack Dorsey

Alexandra Datig, right, accused her ex-fiancée of brandishing a gun at her during an argument in 2015. She said she came out with the story over concerns that Elder was a frontrunner

Alexandra Datig, right, accused her ex-fiancée of brandishing a gun at her during an argument in 2015. She said she came out with the story over concerns that Elder was a frontrunner

Meanwhile, Elder faces voter scrutiny as accusations of verbal and emotional abuse were made public by his ex-fiancée Alexandra Datig, 51, of Los Angeles.

In August, Datig told Politico that Elder threatened her with a .45 pistol during an argument in 2015. 

Datig said she worked on Elder’s show and they lived together during their 18-month romantic relationship from 2013 to 2015. 

A letter and other records provided by Datig to The Associated Press – including an April 6, 2015, email in which she wrote about the collapse of their engagement – allegedly sketch a portrait of an emotionally abusive relationship in which Elder routinely was using medicinal marijuana to excess.

Elder has denied the claims, referring to them as ‘salacious allegations’.

‘I have never brandished a gun at anyone,’ he wrote in a statement released on Twitter.

‘I grew up in South Central; I know exactly how destructive this type of behavior is. It’s not me, and everyone who knows me knows it’s not me. These are salacious allegations.’

Datig said she waited until recently to come forward because she initially didn’t think he would be competitive.

‘I didn’t take it seriously but when Larry started to trend and become the frontrunner, I became extremely concerned,’ she said.

Elder has denied the  abuse claims and referred to them as 'salacious allegations' in a statement released on Twitter.

Elder has denied the  abuse claims and referred to them as ‘salacious allegations’ in a statement released on Twitter.

During his campaign, Elder has received repeated criticism for his decades of comments undermining racism and sexism in America, saying African-Americans and women ‘complain too much.’ 

The black conservative was also criticized for his comments against African Americans in his books and radio talk show, which began in the early 1990s and brushed aside conversations of police brutality during the Rodney King riots, NBC reported.

According to a FiveThirtyEight poll released last week, Elder continues to lead among the gubernatorial hopefuls, with about 22.6 per cent of voters choosing him to replace Newsom. 

Newsom faces a close battle as 51.1 percent of voters think he should stay as governor, with 45.3 percent wanting to recall him. 

If Newsom is recalled on Sept. 14, the rival candidate with the most votes would become the new governor. 

This is the second recall election in California’s history. The first instance happened in 2003, when Gray Davis was sent packing just months into his second term with 55 percent of Californians voting to oust the Democrat. Actor Arnold Schwarzenegger won 48 percent of those who voted to recall to ascend to the office. 

According to a FiveThirtyEight poll released last week, Elder continues to lead among the gubernatorial hopefuls, with about 22.6 per cent of voters choosing him to replace Newsom

According to a FiveThirtyEight poll released last week, Elder continues to lead among the gubernatorial hopefuls, with about 22.6 per cent of voters choosing him to replace Newsom



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