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Idaho professor sparks outrage after saying women should be kept out of colleges to have more kids


Political science professor Scott Yenor teaches at Boise State University and is an author of a book, titled: The Recovery of Family Life

A tenured professor in Idaho has sparked fury after making controversial comments on women who he thinks they should be kept out of engineering, medical and law school to focus on ‘feminine goals’ such as ‘homemaking and having children.’ 

Boise State University political science professor Scott Yenor made the comments during the National Conservatism Conference in Orlando, Florida, on October 31. Yenor is also a Washington fellow at the Claremont Institute. 

‘Young men must be respectable and responsible to inspire young women to be secure with feminine goals of homemaking and having children,’ he said. 

‘Every effort must be made not to recruit women into engineering, but rather to recruit and demand more of men who become engineers. Ditto for med school, and the law, and every trade.’

The professor, who also wrote a book titled: The Recovery of Family Life, elaborated beyond typical sexist stereotypes, telling the audience at one point that it’d be ‘great’ if men and women were separately distinguished in their respective spheres. 

He even later responded after outrage poured in over his remarks, doubling down and saying that while women ‘medicate themselves in their loneliness,’ men should ‘rebuild a country where we act with responsibility and purpose.’

After a video showing his comments went viral on social media this week, female students and lawmakers across the country expressed their shock.

‘He has power. He has power to issue a grade. It’s disgusting. He needs to come into the current century, but it doesn’t sound like he will,’ Emily Walton, an MBA student at Boise State University, told the Idaho Statesman.  

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Pictured: Scott Yenor, a Washington Fellow at The Claremont Institute's Center for the American Way of Life, during his address at the second National Conservatism Conference on October 31

Pictured: Scott Yenor, a Washington Fellow at The Claremont Institute’s Center for the American Way of Life, during his address at the second National Conservatism Conference on October 31

During his remarks, he also said, ‘Women used to have many children when the odds of dying in childbirth were actually very high,’ seemingly bemoaning increased access to birth control.  

Yenor was previously involved on the task force led by Idaho’s far-right Lt. Gov Janice McGeachin to look into claims of ‘indoctrination’ in schools. 

While some students have called on Boise State University to fire the professor, a spokesperson for the institution told the Idaho Statesman that Yenor will not face any sort of repercussion for his comments.

‘Boise State University understands that the open exchange of ideas, which is fundamental to education, can introduce uncomfortable and even offensive ideas,’ university direction of media relations Mike Sharp said. 

‘However, the university cannot infringe upon the First Amendment rights of any members of our community, regardless of whether we, as individual leaders, agree or disagree with the message. No single faculty member defines what Boise State—or any public university—endorses or stands for.’ 

DailyMail.com reached out to Yenor for comment. 

Twitter users criticized the university’s lack of action taken against Yenor while others are saying that by not taking any action, the university is ‘validating’ the professor’s behavior.

One user wrote: ‘I get that Boise State believes in the first amendment and has used that as their out for Scott Yenor. But what I don’t get is how a public university can expect women to feel that they will get an unbiased education from this man. Boise State needs to address this.’ 

Twitter users expressed outrage over Yenor's comments and are concerned at the prospect of him passing on his ideas to students at Boise State University. The university recently released a statement addressing backlash against Yenor, saying that it 'cannot infringe' on Yenor's First Amendment rights

Twitter users expressed outrage over Yenor’s comments and are concerned at the prospect of him passing on his ideas to students at Boise State University. The university recently released a statement addressing backlash against Yenor, saying that it ‘cannot infringe’ on Yenor’s First Amendment rights 

Award-winning journalist Lynn Schmidt said: ‘Scott Yenor is biased against women and is a misogynist. His sexists beliefs that women are less than will permeate all his decisions. The microaggressions he has already committed are a foundation for discrimination. And BSU is validating his behavior.’

Fellow political science professor at BSU, Julie Ann VanDusky-Allen asked how she is supposed to go back to work, ‘knowing that someone who is directly responsible for evaluating my tenure profile thinks women shouldn’t be working and thinks working women are meddlesome and quarrelsome?’  

In response to the recent backlash, Yenor shared a brief video on Twitter, doubling down on his stance and saying that ‘things much change if this country is to rebuild the family.’ 

Yenor said that while women ‘medicate themselves in their loneliness,’ men should ‘rebuild a country where we act with responsibility and purpose.’

In response to the recent criticism he's face, Yenor said that 'independent women are more medicated, meddlesome, and quarrelsome than women need to be.'

In response to the recent criticism he’s face, Yenor said that ‘independent women are more medicated, meddlesome, and quarrelsome than women need to be.’

‘We should build a country where young girls are encouraged to be mothers and wives as well as enjoying fulfilling jobs, if they chose. We should elevate the importance of family life for both men and women in America.’

In a November 23 tweet referring to recent criticism, Yenor added: ‘Our independent women are more medicated, meddlesome, and quarrelsome than women need to be. Without connections to eternity delivered through their family, such women gain their meaning through their seeming participation in the global project.’ 

Democratic State Senator Melissa Wintrow blasted Yenor’s comments and expressed her concerns at the possibility that he might discriminate against female students in the future.

‘You start to wonder, what is the goal here? If it’s to set us back in time and disenfranchise women from as far as we’ve come, that’s a problem,’ she told Idaho Statesman.



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