Hundreds of cyclists strip off as they take part in the World Naked Bike Ride around London 


Daring to bare it all! Hundreds of cyclists strip off as they take part in the annual World Naked Bike Ride around London

  • Hundreds of cheeky cyclists dared to bare as part of the annual World Naked Bike Ride today in London 
  • The annual event first took place in 2004 but was cancelled last year due to the coronavirus pandemic 
  • The campaign is for cyclist rights and body freedom, as well as a protest against the global dependency on oil 

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Hundreds of riders stripped off and pedalled through the streets of London today as part of an annual campaign for cyclist rights and body freedom, as well as a protest against the global dependency on oil. 

Wearing body paint and trainers – and little else – scores of activists bravely took to their saddles to take part in the London leg of the World Naked Bike Ride.

The yearly event, which first took place in 2004 but was cancelled in 2020 due to the coronavirus pandemic, is intended to raise awareness of the danger of cycling and the car culture in the British capital.

Cyclists set off from eight starting points around the capital from 12.45pm, including Clapham Junction, Croydon, Deptford, Hyde Park, Kew Bridge, Regent’s Park, Tower Hill and Victoria Park.

The ride ends near Hyde Park Corner around 5.30pm, and all routes will merge into a 1,000 plus rider peloton, suggested organisers. The course will allow the environmental campaign to deliver its messages over 53 miles (85km) of London’s streets, crossing 14 Thames bridges on the way. 

Riders – many of which covered their bodies in glitter, painted slogans and fancy dress – have been encouraged to wear masks and social distance, while the usual after-party has been cancelled. 

Plenty of bystanders lined the streets to watch the group cycle past – many with their smartphones and cameras at the ready.

Attracting attention: Dozens of bystanders lined the streets to photograph the cyclists as they pedalled through central London

Dare to bare! Hundreds of activists bravely took to their saddles to take part in the London leg of the World Naked Bike Ride

Dare to bare! Hundreds of activists bravely took to their saddles to take part in the London leg of the World Naked Bike Ride

Flying the flag: Cyclists were encouraged to wear face masks and social distance during the ride through the British capital

Flying the flag: Cyclists were encouraged to wear face masks and social distance during the ride through the British capital

Bodies of all shapes and sizes were on show as groups across London made their way to Hyde Park Corner this afternoon

Bodies of all shapes and sizes were on show as groups across London made their way to Hyde Park Corner this afternoon

King of the road! A cyclist enthusiast sported a crown while joining the race (pictured)

Participants covered their bodies in brightly-coloured designs - and some even added accessories to their looks

King of the road! A cyclist enthusiast sported a crown while joining the race (pictured). Participants covered their bodies in brightly-coloured designs – and some even added accessories to their looks

All in it together: The ride ends near Hyde Park Corner around 5.30pm, and all routes will merge into a 1,000 plus rider peloton, suggested organisers

All in it together: The ride ends near Hyde Park Corner around 5.30pm, and all routes will merge into a 1,000 plus rider peloton, suggested organisers

Cyclists in Whitehall, central London, taking part in the World Naked Bike Ride London

Cyclists set off from eight starting points around the capital from 12.45, including Clapham Junction, Croydon, Deptford, Hyde Park, Kew Bridge, Regent’s Park, Tower Hill and Victoria Park

Campaigning: One rider had 'pedal not petrol' penned on to his back in vibrant colours while cycling near Hyde Park today

Campaigning: One rider had ‘pedal not petrol’ penned on to his back in vibrant colours while cycling near Hyde Park today  

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