Huge huntsman spider and its hundreds of babies found nesting on a families oven


‘Flame thrower, anyone?’ Hundreds of baby huntsman spiders are seen crawling all over a family’s oven – as their mother watches over her brood

  • Enormous huntsman spider and its hundreds of babies found nesting on an oven 
  • Huntsman are active during warmer months because of the breeding season
  • Expert arachnologist says huntsman spiders are harmless and usually confused 
  • The misunderstood spider has very poor eyesight and are not highly venomous  

A brave Australian has posted a terrifying photo of a huge huntsman spider on their oven, surrounded by hundreds of its offspring. 

The harmless and timid spider only eats insects, but terrifies humans because of its intimidating appearance and the speed in which it can move. 

The photo, which has been uploaded to Facebook, received plenty of fear-mongering comments, many from those who advise the homeowner to evacuate the house. 

‘Mmmm flame thrower anyone,’ one comment read. 

A brave Australian has posted a terrifying photo of a huge huntsman spider on their oven, surrounded by hundreds of its offspring

‘Turn on the gas, walk away for a few hours, light a match….. This house is done,’ another commented. 

‘Not cooking today love,’ one user joked. 

However, one commenter was less intimidated by the large huntsman family. 

‘I’ve seen this in my room on my roof. I let them be and went to sleep,’ they said.  

Huntsman are one of Australia’s most iconic and feared species of spider. 

During the warmer months of the year every Australian city experiences droves of the visiting arachnids who breed during the summer, with eggs hatching in spring. 

But huntsman spiders are not as threatening as their appearance suggests. 

Huntsman spiders have poor eyesight, are usually confused and are not highly venomous says Dr Lizzie Lowe, an arachnologist at Macquarie University.   

‘They will never intentionally run towards you because they’re small and not highly venomous. They can bite you, but they won’t do any harm.’ 

As for baby huntsman, Dr Lowe suggests giving the spiders some space, as they can cause themselves more harm than you and will usually leave the nesting area. 

‘When the babies hatch out, they disperse very quickly over one or two days. They are highly cannibalistic and don’t want to be eaten by their nestmates. Also they need to have their own food so it’s within their own interests to disperse,’ she said. 

Despite popular belief, huntsman spiders are not as threatening as their appearance suggests, with experts saying the timid spiders are usually confused because of their poor eyesight

Despite popular belief, huntsman spiders are not as threatening as their appearance suggests, with experts saying the timid spiders are usually confused because of their poor eyesight

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