Heavily pregnant woman loses both her unborn twins after ‘border agents denied her medical care’


An eight-and-a-half months pregnant woman lost her unborn twins after border agents allegedly refused to give her medical care before deporting her back to Mexico.

Mayli Vázquez had crossed the US-Mexican border into Yuma, Arizona with her son, 2, and husband Cristhian Pérez, via a dry riverbed early Saturday.

The family were caught within minutes by U.S. Border Patrol agents who held them in custody for around five hours, after taking their fingerprints and photos. 

During that time, Vázquez began feeling seriously unwell and in extreme pain but when her husband asked for medical assistance, they border agents allegedly refused. 

Pérez, 26, claims he pleaded with the officers to tend to his wife, ‘while she writhed in pain in a chair and they ignored her. The Americans denied us care.’

He told news agency EFE the agents even refused to take her temperature and blood pressure.

‘They did not even take her pressure, absolutely nothing,’ he added.

The family were deported back to Mexico that same day and say they arrived in San Luis Río Colorado without money or any idea where to go. They found shelter at a local non-profit, but by the following morning, Vázquez’s condition had gotten worse.

Vázquez was rushed to San Luis General Hospital, where doctors discovered that her twin boys had been dead for over 24 hours.

The couple are heartbroken by the loss. 

Perez said they felt they had no choice but to leave their native Honduras for the US, to escape the endemic violence and gangs, but that the price had been too much.

‘Either we stayed to die in our country of hunger or violence, or we migrated,’ he said. 

‘Today I feel that we have lost too much, I could barely hold my children Derek and John Patrick for five minutes in my arms. We had to cremate them.’ 

Vázquez had to undergo a Caesarean to remove the deceased babies.

A doctor in San Luis Río Colorado, a city in the northern Mexico state of Sonora, tends to Mayli Vázquez, a Honduran migrant, who lost both of her unborn twins on Sunday, a day after she along with her husband Cristhian Pérez and two-year-old son were deported from Arizona to Mexico by U.S. Border Patrol agent. Her husband told news agency EFE that he pleaded with the officers to tend to his wife, ‘while she writhed in pain in a chair and they ignored her’

Mayli Vázquez's journey to the United States border began in January when they abandoned Honduras and spent six months traversing through Mexico before they managed to cross the border. They were denied asylum in the US but she and her husband Cristhian Pérez have ruled out returning to Honduras. They said they are planning to seek employment in Mexico and will attempt to cross the border at a later date.

Mayli Vázquez’s journey to the United States border began in January when they abandoned Honduras and spent six months traversing through Mexico before they managed to cross the border. They were denied asylum in the US but she and her husband Cristhian Pérez have ruled out returning to Honduras. They said they are planning to seek employment in Mexico and will attempt to cross the border at a later date.

María de la Paz Cortés, a Mexico-based lawyer representing the family, claimed that she’s heard multiple similar cases of abuse of migrants by border agents.

‘It is not common for the Border Patrol to act this way. In fact, migrants (can suffer from) dehydration and injuries and they are taken to receive medical attention. But this does not rest on (the U.S. Border Patrol), but in the way in which each immigration agent exercises their duty,’ de la Paz Cortés said.  

DailyMail.com reached out to U.S. Customs and Border Protection for comment, but a spokesperson said the agency does not ‘comment on individual cases due to privacy considerations.’

A section of the United States-Mexico border fence that separates San Luis Río Colorado, a city in the northern state of Sonora, and Arizona

A section of the United States-Mexico border fence that separates San Luis Río Colorado, a city in the northern state of Sonora, and Arizona

This chart shows how 2021 border crossings - pictured in blue - rocketed on crossings made in 2020, represented by the brown line (2018 is pictured in gray, with 2019 in orange)

This chart shows how 2021 border crossings – pictured in blue – rocketed on crossings made in 2020, represented by the brown line (2018 is pictured in gray, with 2019 in orange)

The couple’s journey to the United States border began in January when they abandoned Honduras and spent six months traversing through Mexico before they managed to cross the border.

They were denied asylum in the US but Pérez and Vázquez have ruled out returning to Honduras. They said they are planning to seek employment in Mexico and will attempt to cross the border at a later date.  

The last monthly report released by U.S. Customs and Border Protection showed that Border Patrol agents stopped 180,034 migrants in May along the southwestern border, a slight increase from 178,854 the prior month, with the increase driven largely by single adults.

From March to May more than 530,000 people were apprehended and pushed back into Mexico after attempting to cross without legal immigration documents, the June 10 report also indicated. 

Of the 897,213 migrants who have been stopped for unlawful border entry since October 1, 2020, 167,240 individuals are natives of Honduras.

Border stats for the month of June are slated to be released next week.



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