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Harris says she was frustrated when snapping at Charlamagne for asking who the ‘real president is’


Kamala Harris said in an interview aired Sunday that when she snapped during a talk with Charlamagne tha God, she was ‘frustrated’ over him questioning who the ‘real president is.’

‘People saw you, a flash of anger the other day, when you did that interview with Charlamagne,’ CBS Face the Nation host Margaret Brennan said to the vice president before playing a clip from the interview.

Harris laughed off the tense exchange earlier this month and told Brennan that she felt ‘frustration’ at that point in the interview with Charlamagne tha God.

‘Well, that frustration, we saw that in the Kavanaugh hearings,’ Brennan said in reference to Harris’ time as a U.S. senator when she was questioning the then-Supreme Court Justice nominee.

‘What gets you fired up?’ she asked the VP.

‘Injustice,’ Harris replied. ‘Injustice is just generally what will get me kind of – it’s – I don’t like unfairness. And that is one of the things that will kind of cause me to say, OK some things are fairly innocuous, but unfairness in a way that can be hurtful to someone, I – that’s why I became a prosecutor, you know?’

During Harris’ interview with Charlamagne, whose real name is Lenard Larry McKelvey, the vice president snapped at the host when he asked who was running the country.

Vice President Kamala Harris told CBS News in an interview that aired Sunday she was ‘frustrated’ when she snapped during her interview with Charlamagne tha God earlier this month

Charlamagne (left) asked Harris in a Comedy Central interview 'who's the real president of this country' ¿ leading to a heated exchange between the two

Charlamagne (left) asked Harris in a Comedy Central interview ‘who’s the real president of this country’ – leading to a heated exchange between the two

‘So, who’s the real president of this country? Is it Joe Manchin or Joe Biden, Madam Vice President?’ Charlamagne asked just after centrist Democratic Senator Manchin effectively killed the $1.75 trillion Build Back Better agenda.

‘Come on, Charlamagne. Come on – it’s Joe Biden’ the vice president responded.

‘I can’t tell sometimes,’ he said.

Harris, growing visibly angry, wagged her finger at the host and said: ‘No, no, no, no, no, no, no. It’s Joe Biden.’

‘And I’m vice president. And my name is Kamala Harris,’ she shot back.

Harris’ outgoing chief spokesperson, Symone Sanders, tried to cut off the interview with Charlamagne during the heated exchange.

Brennan asked Harris in her interview, which aired in segments over the last week, if she feels she is ‘judged fairly.’

Harris said: ‘I will leave others to make that decision.’

The vice president did insist, however, that she doesn’t feel like she was set up for failure with an ‘impossible portfolio.’

Some of her fiercest defenders claim she was given some of the most complicated issues to address as vice president, including quelling the prevailing southern border crisis.

Appearing on Comedy Central with Charlamagne on December 19, Harris was asked why she and Biden were unable to pass their flagship $1.75 trillion Build Back Better legislation.

His question so angered Harris that her aide, Sanders, could be heard off-camera on the other end of the remote interview, shouting: ‘I’m so sorry Charlamagne, it’s Symone, we have to wrap.’

‘She can hear me,’ Charlamagne chuckles. Sanders responds: ‘Can you hear me now? I’m sorry but we have to wrap. I’m sorry to interrupt.’

‘They’re acting like they can’t hear me, yo,’ Charlamagne says, turning to a producer off-camera, implying that Harris’ team was faking technical issues. 

Harris, looking tense, stared at Charlamagne and replied, ‘I can hear you,’ allowing the interviewer to finally continue with his question. 

Harris' chief spokesperson Symone Sanders tried to shut down the interview as it got tense. She could be heard off-camera shouting: 'I'm so sorry Charlamagne... we have to wrap'

Harris’ chief spokesperson Symone Sanders tried to shut down the interview as it got tense. She could be heard off-camera shouting: ‘I’m so sorry Charlamagne… we have to wrap’

He then went forward with asking ‘who’s the real president’ of the United States. 

Sanders attempted to cut off the interview. The top Harris aide is one of at least four top aides to announce their departures from the vice president’s staff in recent weeks.

The 32-year-old Sanders will leave by the end of December, but no announcement has been made on whether she has lined up another job, sparking questions over the circumstances surrounding her departure. 

In the interview, Charlamagne then asked why Biden was unable to convince Manchin, the West Virginia senator, to vote for his proposal. 

Manchin’s stubborn refusal to back the government’s plan has put severe obstacles in the passage of Biden’s bill.

Joe Manchin, the West Virginia senator and centrist Democrat, was described by Charlamagne as the real president - to the anger of Harris

Joe Manchin, the West Virginia senator and centrist Democrat who has frequently refused to back Biden’s policies, was described by Charlamagne as the real president

Sanders is one of several top VP staffers to quit in recent weeks

Symone Sanders is seen celebrating her recent birthday after announcing her departure from Harris' office

Symone Sanders is seen celebrating her recent birthday after announcing her departure from Harris’ office

Symone Sanders, Harris’ senior advisor and chief spokesperson, made waves earlier this month by revealing her plans to depart the vice president’s office.

Her resignation follows that of comms director Ashley Etienne weeks earlier, amid rumors that Peter Velz, director of press operations, and Vince Evans, deputy director of the Office of Public Engagement and Intergovernmental Affairs, are both eyeing an exit. 

Sanders, 32, will leave by the end of December, but no announcement has been made on whether she has lined up another job, sparking questions over the circumstances surrounding her departure. 

Harris in recent weeks has battled mounting reports that her office is in disarray, and that her team is frustrated at the White House over being handed ‘no-win’ tasks that don’t suit her skillset. 

Amid the turbulence, Sanders has been Harris’ top bulldog defender, batting back at claims of internal disarray and tension with the West Wing. 

Sanders told the Washington Post that her departure was not due to unhappiness but that she had ‘earned a break.’ 

‘I’m getting married next year. I would like to plan my wedding. You know, I have earned a break. So me deciding that I’m leaving has absolutely nothing to do with my unhappiness. I feel honored every single day to work for the vice president who gave me an opportunity to be her spokesperson at the highest levels.’ 

On Friday, it was becoming apparent that Democrats were unable to pass Biden’s $1.75 trillion domestic investment program and major election reforms by a self-imposed Christmas deadline.

Kamala Harris’s gaffes

June 8:

Asked by NBC’s Lester Holt why she hadn’t yet, in her role as Biden’s border tsar, visited the U.S.-Mexico border, she replied: ‘And I haven’t been to Europe. And I mean, I don’t … understand the point that you’re making. I’m not discounting the importance of the border.’ 

July 10:

Harris was asked about proposals to enforce voter ID, and said that she was opposed to it because people outside the cities may not be able to print off copies of their documentation.

‘There are a whole lot of people, especially people who live in rural communities, who don’t — there’s no Kinko’s, there’s no Office Max near them,’ she said, to widespread mockery.

September 29:

A student attending an event to promote voting said that Israel was conducting an ‘ethnic genocide’ in Palestine. 

Harris responded: ‘Your voice, your perspective, your experience, your truth cannot be suppressed, and it must be heard.’ 

Her office spent the next day trying to calm furious pro-Israel politicians and diplomats. 

October 11:

Harris was found to have used child actors in the recording of a video promoting space, with children gushing about how much they loved science and technology.  

November 10:

The vice president, on a visit to Paris, was mocked for meeting a group of French scientists working in a lab, and speaking to them with a French accent. 

The deadlock over these two high-profile bills put in jeopardy the continuation of an expanded child tax credit for some 3.6 million poor families, which expires on December 31.

Democrats had hoped to extend for another year this six-month-old pilot program as part of Biden’s ‘Build Back Better’ legislation that would expand an array of social programs and battle climate change. 

Manchin has been a key holdout and his support is crucial in a chamber where the Democrats have the slimmest margin of control.

Earlier, White House spokeswoman Jen Psaki told reporters that recent talks with Manchin were encouraging.

‘The president’s going to get this done and we’re going to get it across the finish line. And yes, it’s going to take more time than we anticipated,’ she told reporters aboard Air Force One as Biden traveled to South Carolina.

Harris told Charlamagne on Friday that the administration had already made great strides, and listed their policy achievements and plans.

‘I hear the frustration. but let’s not deny the impact that we’ve had, and agree also that there is a whole lot more work to be done. 

‘And it is not easy to do, but we will not give up. And I will not give up,’ she concluded.

A conciliatory Charlamagne replied: ‘I just want you to know, Madame Vice President, that Kamala Harris, that’s the one I like.

‘That’s the one that was putting the pressure on people in Senate hearings.

‘That’s the one I’d like to see more often out here in these streets.’

The vice president was highly tipped to be the Democrat nominee in 2024 before she took office, and failed to impress. 

Less than half of Americans now approve of the job she is doing.

A new Hill/HarrisX poll released on Tuesday shows 43 per cent of registered voters approve of Harris’s performance, while 50 per cent say they disapprove.

The same poll taken December 6-7 shows 7 per cent of respondents are unsure of their approval of the vice president.

Harris, asked on Friday by The Los Angeles Times, would not say whether she felt that her gender and race were a factor in her low approval ratings.

‘I’ll leave that to other people to evaluate,’ she said.  

She also dodged questions about her poor handling of the U.S.-Mexico border wall, and her high turnover of staff. 

In a separate interview earlier this month, Harris took a swipe at President Joe Biden for declaring independence from COVID-19 on July 4 – and appeared to blame scientists for the United States’ failure to be better prepared for Omicron or Delta.

She told The Los Angeles Times: ‘We have not been victorious over it.’

‘I don’t think that in any regard anyone can claim victory when, you know, there are 800,000 people who are dead because of this virus.’

A new poll released Tuesday shows only 43 per cent of registered voters approve of the job Kamala Harris is doing as vice president

A new poll released Tuesday shows only 43 per cent of registered voters approve of the job Kamala Harris is doing as vice president

The vice president also insisted  that the virologists ‘upon whose advice and direction we have relied’ were blind to the next wave and was sure to note that the Biden administration ‘didn’t see’ Delta and Omicron coming. 

‘We didn’t see Delta coming,’ Harris told the paper. 

‘I think most scientists did not – upon whose advice and direction we have relied – didn’t see Delta coming.’ 

Biden on July 4 celebrated ‘independence’ from the virus, in a positive speech which some have now said was misguided.

‘While the virus hasn’t been vanquished, we know this: It no longer controls our lives,’ the president said. 

‘It no longer paralyzes our nation. And it’s within our power to make sure it never does again.’ 

But Harris denied that the administration declared victory prematurely. 

Harris, pictured in an interview with the Los Angeles Times this month, denied that the administration had been complacent about the end of the pandemic

Harris, pictured in an interview with the Los Angeles Times this month, denied that the administration had been complacent about the end of the pandemic

Harris said one of her biggest regrets is that she had not been able to do more to combat myths about the virus and vaccine. 

‘I would take that more seriously,’ she said of the misinformation. 

‘The biggest threat still to the American people is the threat to the unvaccinated,’ she said. ‘And most people who believe in the efficacy of the vaccine and the seriousness of the virus have been vaccinated. That troubles me deeply.’ 



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