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Greta Thunberg appears on the debut cover of Vogue Scandinavia  


Greta Thunberg accuses fashion brands of GREENWASHING: Activist slams industry for being ‘huge contributor to climate-emergency’ – as she appears on inaugural cover of Vogue Scandinavia

  • Greta Thunberg, from Sweden, appeared on the first cover of Vogue Scandinavia
  • Activist, 18, blasts the fast fashion industry for contributing to climate change
  • Told readers that it’s been three years since she bought new clothes

Greta Thunberg has accused the fashion industry of ‘green-washing’ and called for it to be overhauled to reduce its impact on the eco-system as she appeared on the first ever cover of  Vogue Scandinavia

The climate change activist, 18, who lives in Sweden, said that the fast fashion industry is heavily responsible for damaging the environment as well as exploiting workers and communities around the world. 

Marking her appearance on the inaugural cover, the teenager took to Twitter to blast brands who ‘greenwash’ their campaigns to seem ethical while ‘continuing to promote an unsustainable culture’.

‘You cannot mass produce fashion or consume “sustainably” as the world is shaped today. That is one of the many reasons why we will need a system change,’ she wrote.

Greta Thunberg has sparked a discussion about the impact of the fashion industry on climate change after appearing on the first cover of Vogue Scandinavia (pictured)

Greta (pictured in Berlin in July) revealed in an interview with the publication that she hasn't bought anything new in three years

Greta (pictured in Berlin in July) revealed in an interview with the publication that she hasn’t bought anything new in three years 

The post was one of three tweets Greta penned alongside a link to her interview with Vogue Scandinavia, in which she claimed to have not bought anything new for the past three years.  

‘The last time I bought something new was three years ago and it was second-hand. I just borrow things from people I know,’ she told the fashion bible.

In a series of tweets she added: ‘The fashion industry is a huge contributor to the climate and ecological emergency, not to mention its impact on the countless workers and communities who are being exploited around the world in order for some to enjoy fast fashion that many treat as disposables.

‘Many make it look as if the fashion industry is starting to take responsibility, spending fantasy amounts on campaigns portraying themselves as “sustainable”, “ethical”, “green”, “climate neutral” or “fair”. But let’s be clear: This is almost never anything but pure greenwash.’  

The activist posed for the first ever Vogue Scandinavia  posing wearing an oversized peach trench coat alongside a horse in the forest.

Iris and Mattias Alexandrov Klum, who have a passion for nature, photographed Greta in a series of images for the publication. 

Greta took to Twitter to promote her interview with Vogue Scandinavia, while calling for the fashion industry to stop mass production

Greta took to Twitter to promote her interview with Vogue Scandinavia, while calling for the fashion industry to stop mass production 

Vogue Scandinavia has launched with an aim of becoming ‘the most sustainable media organisation in existence’, while influencing its readers to be more mindful of their impact on the planet with its choice of people featured. 

Copies of the publication are not available from newsstands as they want to avoid unnecessary waste from overprinting, but readers can buy it from their online store.

Greta has become a notable figure for her passionate speeches urging world leaders to tackle climate change.    

She has racked up over 31,000 likes on her post beginning a discussion focused on the impact of the fashion industry. 

Greta (pictured) accused the fast fashion industry of exploiting workers and communities, while portraying themselves as ethical brands

Greta (pictured) accused the fast fashion industry of exploiting workers and communities, while portraying themselves as ethical brands 

A stream of responses to Greta's tweet dubbed her an 'inspiration', while agreeing that the fashion industry is damaging the planet

A stream of responses to Greta’s tweet dubbed her an ‘inspiration’, while agreeing that the fashion industry is damaging the planet 

Responses to Greta’s tweet have praised her for raising awareness of the problem, while debating how the industry can be improved.

One person wrote: ‘You are an amazing inspiration to millions worldwide. I am sorry that this has fallen on your shoulders. We stand with you.’ 

Another said: ‘The fashion industry has a negative impact on the environment. In fact, it is the second largest polluter in the world, just after the oil industry. Synthetic fabrics are a major source of microplastics. Fashion is also the second largest consumer of water, after agriculture.’ 

According to the UN, the fashion industry produces between 2 to 8 per cent of global carbon emissions. The industry could use up a quarter of the world’s carbon budget by 2050 if nothing is changed.    

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