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GOP blasts Mitch McConnell over debt ceiling deal with Chuck Schumer


Some Republicans in Congress are grumbling over the deal Senate Minority Leader Mitch McConnell struck with Senate Majority Leader Chuck Schumer that will allow Democrats to bypass the filibuster to raise the debt ceiling. 

‘There’s a lot of disagreement about the proposal,’ Sen. Kevin Cramer, a North Dakota Republican, told The Hill newspaper. ‘I wouldn’t call it a great deal or a good deal,’ Cramer also told Playbook. 

For months, McConnell has said his ‘red line’ was that Democrats needed to hike the debt ceiling alone, which would allow Republicans to attack them in ads leading up to the midterms for being fiscally irresponsible. 

Senate Majority Leader Chuck Schumer

Some Republicans are grumbling about the debt ceiling deal Senate Minority Leader Mitch McConnell (left) cut with Senate Majority Leader Chuck Schumer (right) that will allow Democrats to bypass the filibuster using a less cumbersome process than reconciliation 

However, the deal McConnell carved out with Schumer added a provision to a bill that delays Medicare sequestration cuts for three months that allows the debt ceiling to be raised using a simple majority vote in this one case. 

McConnell had originally pushed Democrats to use the more cumbersome process of reconciliation to get a debt ceiling hike through. 

McConnell’s concession will allow Democrats to push up the debt ceiling before the December 15 deadline Treasury Secretary Janet Yellen cited.  

It also gives them time to pass President Joe Biden’s Build Back Better reconciliation bill before Schumer’s Christmas deadline.  

The House passed the Medicare-debt ceiling bill Tuesday night with a vote of 222 to 212, with the support of just one Republican, retiring GOP Rep. Adam Kinzinger. 

This legislation will still need the help of 10 GOP senators to pass in the Senate, before, ultimately, a debt ceiling vote can go forward with just Senate Democrats.  

A number of prominent Republicans have already indicated they’ll vote no. 

‘I wouldn’t vote for it,’ Sen. Richard Shelby, a Republican from Alabama, told The Hill. ‘I think we ought to keep our word with the base.’ 

Sen. Mike Rounds, a South Dakota Republican, told The Hill that he was ‘leaning’ toward voting it down. 

‘I just think they can do it with reconciliation,’ Rounds said. ‘They’ve known that from day one.’     

Sen. Mike Lee, sharing a tweet about the complicated process under discussion that would allow Democrats this one time to bypass the filibuster, warned it would ‘neuter the Senate.’ 

‘IT IS AKIN TO “NUKING THE FILIBUSTER!”‘ he tweeted in all caps. 

Sen. Ted Cruz pushed that Republicans were still giving Democrats assistance – even if GOP senators won’t be needed for the final vote. 

‘I don’t think Republicans should be facilitating adding trillions in debt,’ the Texas Republican said, according to Playbook. 

In a tweet Tuesday, Sen. Mike Lee, a Utah Republican, said the deal would 'neuter the Senate' and said it was 'AKIN TO "NUKING THE FILIBUSTER"'

In a tweet Tuesday, Sen. Mike Lee, a Utah Republican, said the deal would ‘neuter the Senate’ and said it was ‘AKIN TO “NUKING THE FILIBUSTER”‘ 

Sen. Ted Cruz, a Texas Republican, also wasn't keen on the deal. 'I don't think Republicans should be facilitating adding trillions in debt,' Cruz offered

Sen. Ted Cruz, a Texas Republican, also wasn’t keen on the deal. ‘I don’t think Republicans should be facilitating adding trillions in debt,’ Cruz offered 

Over on the House side, GOP Rep. Kevin Brady, the ranking member of the House Ways and Means committee, complained that the deal mucked up what should have been a bipartisan Medicare bill, calling it a ‘poison pill.’ 

‘You wrecked a bipartisan agreement for your debt ceiling crisis,’ Brady said Tuesday night on the floor.  

The debt ceiling has generally been voted on by members of both parties, as the debt was taken on by both Republican and Democratic presidents. 

But McConnell, with few cards in his hand with Democrats controlling the White House and both houses of Congress, decided earlier this year to make it a hurdle for his Democratic colleagues – telling them they must raise the debt ceiling alone.  

He argued that the deal struck with Schumer still sticks to that. 

‘The red line is intact,’ McConnell said. ‘The red line is that you have a simple majority party-line vote on the debt ceiling. That’s exactly where we will end up.’   





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