Georgia cop who posted anti-vaxx messages on Facebook and took an Ivermectin dies of COVID-19 


A Georgia police officer who frequently posted messages against the COVID-19 vaccines has died of coronavirus

Captain Joe Manning, 57, of the Wayne County Sheriff’s office, died after a short battle with COVID-19 on Wednesday. 

Before his death, Manning had posted that he was not vaccinated against the virus, celebrating the fact that it was his ‘choice’ and ‘right.’ 

He also promoted the use of Ivermectin, which is used to prevent heartworm disease in farm animals, to combat COVID-19. The drug does not treat COVID-19 and can be  dangerous for human consumption but has been touted as a cure in anti-vaxx circles. 

Capt. Joe Manning, of the Wayne County Sheriff’s Office, in George, died from COVID-19. He was survived by his wife, Tammie, and their three kids

Manning was vocal about his opposition to the COVID-19 vaccine and usually boasted about his unvaccinated status

Manning was vocal about his opposition to the COVID-19 vaccine and usually boasted about his unvaccinated status

Manning also wrote in favor of Ivermectin to combat COVID-19, telling others where to buy it

Manning also wrote in favor of Ivermectin to combat COVID-19, telling others where to buy it

While some forms of Ivermectin can be prescribed to humans who are suffering from parasitic worms or lice, the U.S. Food and Drug Administration has repeatedly urged people not to use the drug against the coronavirus. 

The Wayne County Sheriff's Office confirmed the death of Joe Manning after a short bout with coronavirus

The Wayne County Sheriff’s Office confirmed the death of Joe Manning after a short bout with coronavirus

‘You can also overdose on ivermectin, which can cause nausea, vomiting, diarrhea, hypotension (low blood pressure), allergic reactions (itching and hives), dizziness, ataxia (problems with balance), seizures, coma and even death,’ the FDA warned. 

‘You are not a horse. You are not a cow,’ the FDA posted on Twitter. ‘Seriously y’all. Stop it.’

After posting about the drug in July, Facebook deleted one of Manning’s posts, citing misinformation, The Independent reported.

‘I have been censured again in regards to posting an opinion on COVID and being one who hasn’t been vaccinated,’ Manning wrote in July. 

Manning, a 31-year old veteran of the force, had been promoted to captain in 2017 and served as the administrator at Wayne County Jail. 

‘Captain Manning was an integral part of our family and our hearts are broken. Our love and prayers go forward to his family,’ according to WSAV

 He was survived by his wife, Tammi, their three children and eight grandchildren.

Manning complained when Facebook took down one of his posts about Ivermectin in July

Manning complained when Facebook took down one of his posts about Ivermectin in July

Manning leaves behind three children, and eight grandchildren

Manning leaves behind three children, and eight grandchildren

Manning was a 31-year veteran of the force and had been promoted to captain in 2017

Manning was a 31-year veteran of the force and had been promoted to captain in 2017

Calls to U.S. poison control centers about Ivermectin exposures have increased five-fold from before the pandemic, with a drastic rise in July, the Center for Disease Control said. 

The drug was prescribed 88,000 times in one week, a 24-fold increase over a typical pre-pandemic week, according to the Center for Disease Control and Prevention. 

Clinical trials and observational studies to evaluate the use of ivermectin to prevent and treat COVID-19 in humans have yielded insufficient evidence for the NIH COVID-19 Treatment Guidelines Panel to recommend its use,’ the CDC wrote in a statement on Thursday.

‘Data from adequately sized, well-designed, and well-conducted clinical trials are needed to provide more specific, evidence-based guidance on the role of ivermectin in the treatment of COVID-19.’

The FDA has repeatedly warned Americans not to use Ivermectin to combat COVID-19

The FDA has repeatedly warned Americans not to use Ivermectin to combat COVID-19

Prescriptions of ivermectin, a deworming drug, have increased 24-fold from pre-pandemic levels. The drug has been touted by some conservative figures as a treatment for COVID-19.

Prescriptions of ivermectin, a deworming drug, have increased 24-fold from pre-pandemic levels. The drug has been touted by some conservative figures as a treatment for COVID-19.

Warnings from the CDC, the U.S. Food and Drug Administration and other officials have not prevented Americans from inappropriately using ivermectin.

The drug became popular in some circles after falsehoods about ivermectin’s alleged ability to treat COVID-19 spread on social media after some misinterpreted earlier studies into the drug’s effectiveness.

Some prominent figures in the media have pushed the drug as well.

Between March and this month, Fox News hosts Tucker Carlson, Sean Hannity and Laura Ingraham promoted the drug’s use as an alternative COVID-19 treatment.

In June, Sen Ron Johnson, a Wisconsin Republican, had his YouTube account suspended for posting a video recommending viewers to take ivermectin and hydroxychloroquine as treatments for the virus.

Last week, Mississippi officials reported that 70 percent of recent poison control calls in the state were because of misuse of the dewormer.

Texas has reported a sharp spike in poison calls as well when compared to last year.

In August 2020, Texas reported two poison control calls related to ivermectin, reported WFAA.

This August, the state received 55 calls, a 27-fold increase.

Additionally, Texas Poison Control recorded 23 ivermectin poisoning cases from January to August 2020, compared to 150 this year – a 552 percent increase.

These figures are likely an undercount.



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