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Former Minneapolis cop Kim Potter WILL testify at manslaughter trial for the death of Daunte Wright


Kim Potter, the Minnesota cop who resigned after fatally shooting Daunte Wright, will take the stand at her manslaughter trial her attorneys revealed as jury selection continued on Wednesday. 

Potter, 49, has been charged with first- and second-degree manslaughter in the April 11 killing of Daunte Wright, 20, who the former Brooklyn Center cop pulled over for having an air freshener hanging from his rearview mirror and expired license plate tags. 

‘Officer Potter will testify and tell you what she remembers happened, so you will know not just from the video but from the officers at the scene and Officer Potter herself what was occurring,’ her lawyer Paul Engh confirmed on Tuesday. 

‘I think [you] should be quite interested in hearing what she had to say.’   

Kim Potter, 49, (center) appears in court Wednesday. Her lawyers said the former cop will testify at her manslaughter trial in death of Daunte Wright, 20

Potter was a former police officer at Brooklyn Center Police Department, near Minneapolis, before resigning after fatally shooting Wright on April 11. She claims Wright resisted arrest by trying to get back into the car and drive away and that she mistook her service weapon for her stun gun

Potter was a former police officer at Brooklyn Center Police Department, near Minneapolis, before resigning after fatally shooting Wright on April 11. She claims Wright resisted arrest by trying to get back into the car and drive away and that she mistook her service weapon for her stun gun

Wright (pictured) was pulled over for having an air freshener hanging from his rearview mirror and for having expired license plates. After running his license, the three officers found out he also had an arrest warrant for an outstanding misdemeanor for a weapons violation

Wright (pictured) was pulled over for having an air freshener hanging from his rearview mirror and for having expired license plates. After running his license, the three officers found out he also had an arrest warrant for an outstanding misdemeanor for a weapons violation

While Potter’s defense team made the announcement inside the Hennepin County Government Center as jury selection began, protesters outside the  court swarmed a a car after its driver slowly passed through a crowd around 5pm.  

At one point, one protester was seen sitting on the hood of the car and was carried down the road until the car stopped at an intersection, where he was able to safely dismount the vehicle. 

Many other protesters began to rock the car and punched the windows while the driver waited for the green light. The car was able to safely make a righthand turn onto to adjacent road. 

Protesters screamed ‘f**k you’ as the car drove away. 

It is unknown why the driver did not take an alternative route. Police Chief Garrett Parten reported no injuries, according to KSTP

Earlier that day, protesters stood outside the building chanting: ‘Say his name: Daunte Wright.’ 

‘They are on the 18th floor, and we’re down here,’ protester Sharolyn Hagen told KSTP. ‘I hope they can feel a little bit of our presence.’   

Protests rally Tuesday outside the Hennepin County Government Center during the first day of jury selection

Protests rally Tuesday outside the Hennepin County Government Center during the first day of jury selection

Protesters held signs with Potter's face on them as they marched through the streets

Protesters held signs with Potter’s face on them as they marched through the streets 

A car (pictured) drove through the protest before turning on an adjacent road

A car (pictured) drove through the protest before turning on an adjacent road 

Eight jurors have been selected as of Wednesday afternoon. 

Two men and two women were the first to be selected on Tuesday, with four more added to the panel on Wednesday.   

The first juror is a white man in his 50s who is a medical journal editor and has an unfavorable view of Blue Lives Matter, CBS Minnesota reported. 

The second juror, a white female, is a retired special education teacher who is said to have favorable views of both Potter and Wright.   

The third juror is also a white man who in his 20s and said to be working at Target and spent years touring with a rock bank and ‘distrusts police,’ CBS Minnesota reported. 

The fourth juror is a self-described ‘rule-following’ Asian woman in her 40s who is concerned about getting paid by her employer while serving on the jury. 

The other four jurors selected Wednesday have yet to be identified by their race. 

Seven potential jurors have been denied, including No. 15 who said she worked for the Minnesota Attorney General Keith Ellison’s campaign in 2018. She also admitted to attending George Floyd protest and visited the square named after him and supports defunding the police.   

Opening arguments are scheduled to start next Wednesday.  

Potter and two other officers attempted to detain Wright after finding that there was an outstanding warrant for his arrest for a misdemeanor weapons violation.

On body camera footage of the incident, training officer Anthony Luckey can be seen trying to arrest Wright and put handcuffs on him, but Wright spun away and got back in the car.

Within seconds, Potter warned Wright repeatedly that she was going to use her stun gun. Potter drew her service weapon instead, however, and fired a single shot.

Realizing her mistake, Potter became hysterical and told Luckey and another officer at the scene she had grabbed the wrong weapon: ‘I shot him!’

Wright's father Aubrey (left) and mother Katie (right) were seen at the Hennepin County Government Center on Tuesday

Wright's father Aubrey (left) and mother Katie (right) were seen at the Hennepin County Government Center on Tuesday

Wright’s father Aubrey (left) and mother Katie (right) were seen at the Hennepin County Government Center on Tuesday 

Daunte Wright's brother Damik (right) was seen praying in the lobby next to a woman on Tuesday

Daunte Wright’s brother Damik (right) was seen praying in the lobby next to a woman on Tuesday 

Judge Regina Chu (pictured) ruled that Wright's criminal record and allegations may only be permissible if Potter was aware of his prior conduct. She also ordered the jury be fully sequestered once deliberations begin

Judge Regina Chu (pictured) ruled that Wright’s criminal record and allegations may only be permissible if Potter was aware of his prior conduct. She also ordered the jury be fully sequestered once deliberations begin 

Her lawyers have accused the prosecution of disregarding the conduct of Wright, who they said resisted arrest and attempted to drive away. Potter, a 26-year veteran of the police force, resigned after the incident.      

On evidentiary matters, Judge Regina Chu ruled that Wright’s criminal record and allegations, including that he shot someone in the head, was a member of a street gang, assaulted and robbed a man in March and was subject to restraining orders, may only be admissible if Potter was aware of Wright’s prior conduct. 

Chu has ordered the jury fully sequestered once deliberations begin.

In Minnesota, the maximum sentences for first- and second-degree manslaughter are 15 years and 10 years, respectively. 

For Potter to be found guilty on second-degree manslaughter charges, prosecutors will need to prove that she acted with ‘culpable negligence’ when she shot Wright. 

For a conviction on the first-degree charge, a jury would have to find that Potter was aware of the risk of killing Wright and ‘made a conscious decision to act without regard’ to the risk, Hennepin County Judge Regina Chu wrote.   

Wright’s shooting occurred only a few miles from the courthouse where Derek Chauvin, a white former Minneapolis police officer, was convicted in April of murder in the death of Floyd, a 46-year-old black man, during an arrest in May 2020.

Floyd’s death sparked demonstrations in many US cities last year against police brutality and racism. Wright’s shooting triggered several nights of demonstrations in Brooklyn Center, with many viewing the incident as yet another example of police violence against black Americans.



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