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Florida students America oppresses women change tune compares living in Afghanistan under Taliban


Reality check: Watch Florida students who think America oppresses women change their tune when asked to consider living in Afghanistan under the Taliban

  • American women on a college campus in Florida were questioned about the rights of women in the United States
  • Their fears were compared to the situation in Afghanistan with many people  worried about the rights of women and children under Taliban rule
  • All the students spoken with changed their minds once they had been explained what conditions under the Taliban were like


A group of students from Florida claimed to feel ‘oppressed’ living in the United States before a reporter reminded them of the conditions endured by women in Afghanistan under the Taliban.  

The simple comparison was made by Ophelie Jacobson, a reporter with Campus Reform, a conservative news website earlier this week.

Jacobson walked around the campus at the University of Central Florida in Orlando to gauge what was on the minds of female students.

American women on a college campus in Florida were questioned about the rights of women in the United States, with all of them feeling ‘oppressed’ living in the U.S., at first 

All of the students that Jacobson spoke with said they believed women in the U.S. were oppressed and were treated unfairly

All of the students that Jacobson spoke with said they believed women in the U.S. were oppressed and were treated unfairly

The interviews were conducted on the campus at the University of Central Florida in Orlando

The interviews were conducted on the campus at the University of Central Florida in Orlando

All of the students that Jacobson spoke with said they believed women in the U.S. were oppressed and were treated unfairly.

‘There’s definitely some unfair treatment in some aspects,’ one student said. 

‘We already have a lower pay range even if we are overqualified for the position,’ another student added.

‘I’ve quit so many jobs because of the way I was treated at work,’ explained one student.

‘There’s a lot of traditional perspectives on what a woman should do and what a woman shouldn’t do,’ explained another student.

All of those interviewed agreed that it was ‘hard’ to be a woman in the US. 

'We already have a lower pay range even if we are overqualified for the position,' one student said

‘We already have a lower pay range even if we are overqualified for the position,’ one student said

All of those interviewed agreed that it was 'hard' to be a woman in the US

All of those interviewed agreed that it was ‘hard’ to be a woman in the US

All the women changed their mind when compared to the conditions endured by women living under the Taliban

All the women changed their mind when compared to the conditions endured by women living under the Taliban

Turning her attention to Afghanistan, Jacobson explained how during Taliban rule, girls were not allowed to go to school, women were not allowed to have a job nor hold a position in government and were regularly beaten and killed.

She explained how over the past 20 years, ‘the lives of Afghan women had been improved greatly because of the American presence.’

The reactions of those Jacobson spoke with could not have been more stark as all made a sharp u-turn in their viewpoints as the conditions once endured by women living under the Taliban regime was explained.

A Taliban fighter keeps Afghans from crossing and explains the process of a checkpoint passage before the road that leads to the military entrance of the airport, in Kabul, on Thursday

A Taliban fighter keeps Afghans from crossing and explains the process of a checkpoint passage before the road that leads to the military entrance of the airport, in Kabul, on Thursday

Evacuees board an aircraft as the U.S. Department of Defense has said it is committed to supporting the U.S. State Department in the departure of U.S. and allied civilian personnel from Afghanistan, and to evacuate Afghan allies safely

Evacuees board an aircraft as the U.S. Department of Defense has said it is committed to supporting the U.S. State Department in the departure of U.S. and allied civilian personnel from Afghanistan, and to evacuate Afghan allies safely

‘It makes me very nervous for the young girls growing up who might not be able to get an education,’ one concerned woman said. 

‘It’s terrible. I don’t know what more to say,’ lamented one young lady.

‘It’s kind of an extreme version of sexism and misogyny,’ agreed another.

‘It’s awful – I think the U.S. should take in as many Afghan refugees as we can’ 

The students who spoke with Jacobson said that learning how Afghani women could be treated by the Taliban had changed their perspectives compared to what they had to endure living in America. 

‘It could be worse here, but it is definitely easier to be a woman here,’ said one woman, changing her mind.

‘Obviously in other areas it’s a lot worse. With that situation, now that I know, obviously there’s not as much to complain about here than over there,’ another student agreed.

‘We still got it a lot better than many other women in other countries around the world,’ another added.

Allyson Reneau, a mother of 11 who graduated from Harvard in 2016 with a masters in international relations and U.S. space policy helped rescue 10 girls on Afghanistan's robotics team and took them to the safety of Quatar

Allyson Reneau, a mother of 11 who graduated from Harvard in 2016 with a masters in international relations and U.S. space policy helped rescue 10 girls on Afghanistan’s robotics team and took them to the safety of Quatar

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