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Families share creative ways they spent the holiday season with COVID


Merry COVID Christmas! Families share the VERY unusual ways they let Omicron-positive family members join in the festivities

  • A series of American families took to Tik Tok over the holiday weekend to document the creative ways they kept infected family members isolated
  • Popular methods of keeping other family members safe included placing those infected in isolation boxes, bubble wrapping homes and wearing masks
  • Families also ensured safety by keeping members in other rooms or at a reasonable distance to prevent a house-wide spread
  • The COVID-infected holiday season comes amid the surge in positive cases and the presence of the new Omicron variant


A series of families took to social media over the course of the holiday weekend to show off the unusual ways they let COVID positive members join in their festivities. 

Thousands of Americans, some with their families, were forced to quarantine for the holidays to avoid infecting other members with the virus.

The recent holiday surge comes amid the presence of the Omicron variant which also saw flight and travel plans cancelled this past week. 

America has now recorded 51.8 million COVID cases, and close to 817,000 deaths, with New York smashing its prior case records as Omicron surges there.  

Despite the increasing rate of cases, American families did not let the virus get in the way of their festive holiday fun.

Measures such as plastic wrapping homes, keeping COVID-positive members in isolation boxes, and of course wearing masks were all a part of the new ‘normal’ way of celebrating Christmas.

Long Island Tik Toker @cristalarock was captured eating Christmas dinner in what appeared to be a spray tan tent in an attempt to keep her involved in the fun after she tested positive

Another TikToker @mpgriz3 also had an isolation box created for her called the COVID Christmas Hut of Shame which she stayed in as her brother handed her presents using a grabber

Another TikToker @mpgriz3 also had an isolation box created for her called the COVID Christmas Hut of Shame which she stayed in as her brother handed her presents using a grabber

TikToker @ktjcarly showed her sister sitting in an isolated 'bubble' and wearing a mask in an attempt to get her join in on the festive family fun

TikToker @ktjcarly showed her sister sitting in an isolated ‘bubble’ and wearing a mask in an attempt to get her join in on the festive family fun

One of the most popular trends was isolating family members in boxes at events such as Christmas dinners, opening presents and other normal traditions.

In one video, Tik Toker @cristalarock was seen seated at the end of the family dinner table in isolation as she had been infected with the virus just in time for the holiday season. 

Her Long Island family wanted to ensure they kept proper precautions as only immediate members were at the holiday gathering. 

Another video from @mpgriz3 captured a similar scenario where a brother made his positive sister a COVID Christmas Hut of Shame, similar to the isolation box concept. 

The brother was seen handing his sister gifts in the ‘hut’ using a grabber to avoid direct contact.

Other measures included wearing masks and even wrapping up entire homes in plastic wrap

Other measures included wearing masks and even wrapping up entire homes in plastic wrap

In an attempt to diffuse the situation with humor, @johnmingione created a spoof of Baby, It's Cold Outside with Baby, it's Covid outside

In an attempt to diffuse the situation with humor, @johnmingione created a spoof of Baby, It’s Cold Outside with Baby, it’s Covid outside

Another Tik Toker @ktjcarly captured her sister trapped in a bubble-like container wearing a mask as she sat with other members of her family. 

She jokingly remarked that the girls’ father had the infected sister a bubble suit, gloves and mask as well as ensuring that she kept around fifty feet away from everyone else.  

Families also kept their distance from infected members by forcing them to eat or open presents in separate rooms.

Others were forced to wear masks in their homes or keep a safe distance from family members. 

Some did not include infected family members at all as they were forced to stay isolated in their bedrooms or stay at other residences.    

However, everyone seemed to diffuse the situation with humor and hope for a more normal holiday season next year.

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