Donald Trump’s niece says his Twitter ban and golf snub are worse for him than losing the election


The niece who wrote scathing book about former U.S. President Donald Trump said she believes he is more upset about being banned from Twitter than he is about losing the 2020 election to President Joe Biden.

Clinical psychologist Mary Trump said in an interview with Business Insider that Trump is also more agitated about being unable to host the 2022 PGA championship at one of his golf properties than being voted out of the White House in November.

‘I think that being banned from Twitter and having the PGA take their tournament away from his golf courses are probably the worst things that have happened to him in the last four years,’ she said. ‘How is he managing without Twitter? Because even he must realize that people really aren’t paying attention to him in the same way.’

Donald Trump’s niece, Mary Trump, says the former U.S. President is more upset about being banned from Twitter and a PGA tournament than he is about losing the 2020 election

President Donald Trump looks at his phone during a roundtable with governors on the reopening of America's small businesses at the White House on June 18, 2020

President Donald Trump looks at his phone during a roundtable with governors on the reopening of America’s small businesses at the White House on June 18, 2020

'Too Much and Never Enough' by Mary Trump is pictured in a bookstore in the Manhattan borough of New York City on July 14, 2020

‘Too Much and Never Enough’ by Mary Trump is pictured in a bookstore in the Manhattan borough of New York City on July 14, 2020

Since he was permanently suspended from Twitter, the former president has been reduced to issuing press releases that often echo the tone of his previous acerbic tweets, but don’t have the same reach or impact.

The press normally still report on his public communications, though.

New York Times Washington correspondent Maggie Haberman echoed the claims made by Mary Trump in a January report, saying her sources said the former president was ‘gutted’ by the cancellation of the golf tournament, and his anger over that was a ‘different order of magnitude’ than it was about his second impeachment.

Twitter announced a ‘permanent suspension’ of Trump’s account on the social media platform on January 8.

The PGA of America said on January 10 that the golf organization canceled its contract with Trump National Golf Club in Bedminster, N.J., to play the 2022 PGA championship there, Golf Channel Digital reported.

‘The PGA of America Board of Directors voted tonight to exercise the right to terminate the agreement to play the 2022 PGA Championship at Trump Bedminster,’ PGA of America President Jim Richerson said in a statement. 

Both announcements came within days of the storming of the U.S. Capitol in Washington, D.C., by a large group of Trump supporters January 6.

Participants in the violent protest and other Trump backers were angered by his failure to win the November presidential election amid what they falsely claimed was a rigged election and voter fraud.

Twitter’s statement about the cancellation eluded to widespread accusations that Trump had incited the insurrectionist event in a speech shortly before his supporters stormed the building where members of Congress were certifying Joe Biden’s election as president.

It read: ‘After close review of recent Tweets from the @realDonaldTrump account and the context around them — specifically how they are being received and interpreted on and off Twitter — we have permanently suspended the account due to the risk of further incitement of violence.’

Police clash with supporters of U.S. President Donald Trump inside the Capitol building in Washington, D.C., on January 6

Police clash with supporters of U.S. President Donald Trump inside the Capitol building in Washington, D.C., on January 6

Protesters enter the Senate Chamber on January 6 in Washington, DC. Congress held a joint session earlier that day to ratify President-elect Joe Biden's Electoral College victory over President Donald Trump. Pro-Trump protesters entered the U.S. Capitol building after mass demonstrations

Protesters enter the Senate Chamber on January 6 in Washington, DC. Congress held a joint session earlier that day to ratify President-elect Joe Biden’s Electoral College victory over President Donald Trump. Pro-Trump protesters entered the U.S. Capitol building after mass demonstrations

Trump’s niece said she was skeptical about the prospect of him making another run for president, viewing any rumors of Trump 2024 campaign as just another tactic to ‘keep grifting’ from his supporters.

‘It’s all about maintaining the grip on power,’ she said. ‘He thinks on some level it’s going to allow him to continue to operate with impunity as he has done his whole life, and also it’s going to allow him to keep grifting money off of people.’

Simon & Schuster announced Mary Trump’s ‘Too Much and Never Enough’ sold a company record 950,000 copies in combined print, digital and audio editions as of its first date of sale in July.

President Trump and his allies tried to stop the book’s publication, claiming Mary Trump violated a nondisclosure agreement, but a judge denied the request for an injunction.

From left, Eric Trump, Donald Trump Jr., Ivanka Trump and Donald Trump attend the ground breaking of the Trump International Hotel at the Old Post Office Building in Washington, D.C., July 23, 2014

From left, Eric Trump, Donald Trump Jr., Ivanka Trump and Donald Trump attend the ground breaking of the Trump International Hotel at the Old Post Office Building in Washington, D.C., July 23, 2014

The book alleged that in the Trump family, ‘financial worth is the same as self-worth; humans are only valued in monetary terms.’

Mary Trump claimed a ‘killer’ instinct is revered, while qualities like empathy, kindness and expertise are punished among the Trumps. 

Within the family, ‘taking responsibility for your failures is discouraged’ and they see ‘cheating as a way of life,’ she wrote.





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