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Deadly Saskatchewan Screamer storm reaches the northeast, causing coastal flooding and snowstorms


The Saskatchewan Screamer continued its wintery wrath Monday as the deadly storm brought snowfalls, thunderstorms, and strong winds to the northeastern US.

The ongoing storm – also known as Izzy – is being blamed for more than 150,000 power outages, airport havoc, and a pair of deaths in North Carolina.

More than 1,700 US flights were cancelled Monday and about 1,500 were delayed, according to the flight tracking website Flightaware. Road travel is also a mess, with about 500 crashes reported in Virginia alone, and officials are warning people not to travel in some parts of the country.

A foot of snow was forecasted for parts of New England, New York state, Ohio and Pennsylvania through Tuesday morning.

The highest level of snow during the storm was recorded in Harpersfield, Ohio where 22.5 inches of snow landed as 40 counties within the state were under storm warnings Monday. Residents of Sherrodsville, Ohio, pulled out their measuring sticks to snap photos of 14 inches of snow piled on the ground.

Forecasters in Buffalo, New York, said the snow was falling fast, dumping more than 16 inches by 8am. The city advised people not to travel if they didn’t need to on Martin Luther King Jr. Day, while some surrounding towns instituted a travel ban.

New York City and Boston were spared the heaviest snowfall, which was accumulating at higher elevations in western Massachusetts, eastern Pennsylvania and parts of New England.

A Suffolk County police car is pictured powering through a flooded area of New York on January 16 after the ongoing Saskatchewan Screamer storm flooded coastal regions on the east coast and caused snowstorms inland

A National Park Service worker shovels snow near the Washington monument on January 17 following a snow-filled night

A National Park Service worker shovels snow near the Washington monument on January 17 following a snow-filled night

Visitors walk past the Martin Luther King Jr. memorial as the sun breaks through the clouds in Washington, DC on January 17

Visitors walk past the Martin Luther King Jr. memorial as the sun breaks through the clouds in Washington, DC on January 17

Women are seen jogging past the Lincoln Memorial plaza January 17 after a stormy night in Washington, DC

Women are seen jogging past the Lincoln Memorial plaza January 17 after a stormy night in Washington, DC

Snow dusts the grass surrounding headstones at Arlington National Cemetery in Virginia on January 17

Snow dusts the grass surrounding headstones at Arlington National Cemetery in Virginia on January 17

As eight inches of snow accumulated in the Lower Hudson Valley, downpours drenched coastal cities, causing flooding in some regions, the National Weather Service said.

Flood warnings were in effect Monday morning for parts of New York City, including:  Brooklyn, Staten Island, Queens, the Bronx and Manhattan.

Snow will continue to fall at a rate of one-to-two inches per hour from northwest Pennsylvania to northern New York and into western and northern New England, NWS forecasters said. 

Winter storm warnings remained in effect from southern New York to Northern New England, said CNN meteorologist Jennifer Gray.

‘The I-95 corridor has pretty much been the dividing line between rain and snow,’ she said on air. ‘The snow has really been in interior sections and all the rain along the coast.’

New York Governor Kathy Hochul gave residents a stern warning: ‘Please stay home. But if your work requires you to be out or you have to be somewhere, make sure that you are fortified even in your own vehicle with food and water and whatever else you may need, including blankets or clothing.’ 

The wind-driven storm is being blamed after two people died Sunday night when their car went off road and collided with trees in Raleigh, North Carolina. 

The crash happened as the brutal storm was already caused chaos across much of the country, bringing tornadoes, heavy snowfall, power outages for 260,000 and cancelations of over 3,000 flights.

Now the extreme weather is battering  the northeast, with torrents of snow, sleet and rain triggering widespread flood warnings. 

A woman is pictured walking her dog January 17 along Rockaway Beach, Queens, which was under a flood warning

A woman is pictured walking her dog January 17 along Rockaway Beach, Queens, which was under a flood warning

People in the Bronx are pictured bundling up January 17 as rain hammered the area during the ongoing winter storm Izzy

People in the Bronx are pictured bundling up January 17 as rain hammered the area during the ongoing winter storm Izzy

Virginia, Georgia, and North and South Carolina meanwhile have all declared states of emergency as workers attempting to clear debris and restart public transport reel from the brutal conditions.  

Areas such as central Mississippi and central North Carolina received around nine inches of snow over the weekend, while parts of central South Carolina had up to a half-inch of ice, according to the NWS. 

Forecasters said wind gusts in New York City could top out around 45 mph and around 60 mph on Long Island.

NWS meteorologists in Boston said wind gusts could reach 70 mph.

The howling winds spread a fire that destroyed a motel and two other structures in coastal Salisbury, Massachusetts, early Monday.

A Cuyahoga Falls, Ohio resident is pictured plowing their walkway Monday after snow blanketed the region

A Cuyahoga Falls, Ohio resident is pictured plowing their walkway Monday after snow blanketed the region

A backyard in Sherrodsville, Ohio is pictured Monday after 14 inches of snow here in the town

A backyard in Sherrodsville, Ohio is pictured Monday after 14 inches of snow here in the town

Plows are pictured clearing snow from the streets of Cleveland, Ohio on January 17

Plows are pictured clearing snow from the streets of Cleveland, Ohio on January 17

In New Hampshire, the state closed its five COVID-19 testing sites as well as a vaccine clinic.

The storm also triggered several tornadoes Sunday, with one twister wiping out mobile home parks in Fort Meyers, Florida, leaving upward of 200 residents homeless.

Shocking video footage showed how the tornado obliterated the local Tropicana RV resort; the nearby Cottage Point Trailer Park was also hit.

Lee County Commissioner Cecil Pendergrass said 28 homes were destroyed and another 62 were rendered unlivable.



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