Cuomo will be technically homeless when he leaves office


New York Gov. Andrew Cuomo on Tuesday gave himself 14 more days in office until he officially steps down in disgrace.

While his official move-out date from the executive residence in Albany is unclear, what’s even less certain is where he will end up after that. 

The outgoing governor – who announced his resignation after he was found by the state attorney general to have sexually harassed 11 women –  only began living in the 165-year-old residence in 2019, following his split with longtime partner Sandra Lee.  

Before that, the two shared a 4,129-square-foot colonial in Mount Kisco since moving there in 2008. 

On December 23, 2020, however, she sold the home, called Lily Pond, for $1.85 million.

Outgoing Gov. Andrew Cuomo was seen in Midtown Manhattan following his resignation announcement Tuesday. With his stepping down now official, it remains unclear where he will live once his tenure is up in 14 days

One thing is for certain, he will have to vacate the governor's mansion in Albany, where he has been living since 2019 following his split from Sandra Lee

One thing is for certain, he will have to vacate the governor’s mansion in Albany, where he has been living since 2019 following his split from Sandra Lee 

Featuring two pools, a greenhouse, tennis courts and a gym, the mansion has housed 32 governors and their families since 1874

Featuring two pools, a greenhouse, tennis courts and a gym, the mansion has housed 32 governors and their families since 1874

That would leave Cuomo technically homeless, according to available public records, the New York Post reported. 

In Albany, he leaves behind a storied residence, which has housed 32 governors and their families.

Originally built by businessman Thomas Olcott in 1856, Samuel Tilden became the first governor to reside in the house in 1874, renting it for $9,000 a year.

The residence was originally built in 1856 by businessman Thomas Olcott (pictured standing on the porch)

The residence was originally built in 1856 by businessman Thomas Olcott (pictured standing on the porch) 

The home pictured in 1870 after its first major renovation. The first governor to live there would move in in 1875, and New York state would purchase the property in 1877

The home pictured in 1870 after its first major renovation. The first governor to live there would move in in 1875, and New York state would purchase the property in 1877

The mansion as seen in 1960. It has undergone major changes over subsequent gubernatorial administrations

The mansion as seen in 1960. It has undergone major changes over subsequent gubernatorial administrations

The Italianate structure would become state property two years later, when Gov. Lucius Robinson would purchase it for $45,000, or $1.1million in today’s money, in 1877.

It has since been renovated and expanded a number of times as subsequent governors altered the residence.

Theodore Roosevelt constructed a gymnasium, and Franklin Delano Roosevelt installed a swimming pool. Nelson Rockefeller added tennis courts.

Cuomo and Sandra Lee shared this Mount Kisco property from 2008 to 2019, but in December, 2020 Lee sold it for $1.83million

Cuomo and Sandra Lee shared this Mount Kisco property from 2008 to 2019, but in December, 2020 Lee sold it for $1.83million 

With the sale of the home, it would appear Cuomo has no more property holdings

With the sale of the home, it would appear Cuomo has no more property holdings 

Cuomo’s own mother, Matilda, would undertake a major renovation of the property in 1983, while his father, Mario, was in office.

With private funding, she restored the first and second floors of the mansion, and its pool, which had since been filled in and converted to a greenhouse.

The greenhouse, tennis courts as well as indoor and outdoor pools remain.  

One possible destination for the governor might be his brother and CNN anchor Chris Cuomo’s $2.9million home in the Hamptons, where he famously quarantined in his basement during the early stretch of the pandemic. 

He would film segments of his show there before documenting his emergence on camera.

Another option could be the Southampton home of his younger brother and CNN anchor Chris Cuomo, who famously quarantined in its basement (pictured) in the opening weeks of the pandemic

Another option could be the Southampton home of his younger brother and CNN anchor Chris Cuomo, who famously quarantined in its basement (pictured) in the opening weeks of the pandemic

The younger Cuomo would film himself emerging from the basement, although he had reportedly been seen outside in the Hamptons breaking quarantine days earlier

The younger Cuomo would film himself emerging from the basement, although he had reportedly been seen outside in the Hamptons breaking quarantine days earlier

‘Alright here is it, the official re-entry from the basement, cleared by CDC. A little sweaty, just worked out, it happens,’ He said as he walked up the steps. ‘This is what I’ve been dreaming of, literally for weeks.’ 

The younger Cuomo, however, had been seen outside days before the segment, reportedly getting into a fight with a biker who had called him out for breaking quarantine. 

Another possible destination would be with his 89-year-oold mother, who owns a co-op in Manhattan on Sutton Place South, which she and her late husband purchased for $595,000 in 1995. 

Cuomo's mother also still reportedly lives in her Manhattan co-op on Sutton Place South, which she purchased in 1995 with her late husband Mario

Cuomo’s mother also still reportedly lives in her Manhattan co-op on Sutton Place South, which she purchased in 1995 with her late husband Mario

Cuomo’s sister, Maria Cuomo-Cole along with her husband and fashion designer Kenneth Cole, have a number of holdings as well, with homes in Westchester County and Martha’s Vineyard in Massachusetts, the Post also reported.

And in 2002, economist Jeffery Sachs, reportedly let Cuomo stay at financial district rental at 1 West Street after his divorce from Kerry Kennedy.          



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