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China DENIES WHO access to bat caves as part of Covid-19 investigation


China DENIES WHO access to hundreds of bat caves and wildlife breeding farms as part of Covid-19 outbreak investigation

  • World Health Organisation scientists want to look at caves and farms in Wuhan
  • They believe bats and other animals there could hold key to Covid-19 outbreak
  • But the Chinese government has refused the experts access to the areas
  • Wet markets in the Enshi prefecture were banned from selling live animals in December 2019 – shortly before China acknowledged virus


China is denying the World Health Organisation access to caves and farms near Wuhan which could hold clues to determining the origins of the Covid-19 pandemic.

Scientists want to visit a series of caves and wildlife farming areas in the Enshi prefecture of Hubei province – six hours west of the city where Covid-19 was first reported.

According to the Washington Post, the farms in the region were known to be thousands of wild animals download sold out in wet markets.

Their existence has produced the theory that farm animals acted as an intermediary for the virus between bats and humans.

Scientists want to visit a series of caves and wildlife farming areas in the Enshi prefecture of Hubei province which could hold clues to determining the origins of the Covid-19 pandemic (stock photo)

There is a theory that farm animals in Enshi acted as an intermediary for the virus between bats and humans. But Chinese officials are refusing to give the WHO access to carry out their research (stock photo)

There is a theory that farm animals in Enshi acted as an intermediary for the virus between bats and humans. But Chinese officials are refusing to give the WHO access to carry out their research (stock photo)

But Chinese officials are refusing to give the WHO access to carry out their research.

Beijing has continually denied suggestions that COVID-19 first emerged in Chinese wet markets or was the result of lab leak, saying that it originated elsewhere.

The wildlife farms have been a source of interest after emerged that several wet markets where animals from the farms were being sold were banned from selling live animals in December 2019.

This came just days before the Chinese government first acknowledged that a new virus had been detected at a Wuhan market. 

It has been reported that some of the wildlife farms are located only about a mile from the entrance to the bat caves in Enshi (stock photo)

It has been reported that some of the wildlife farms are located only about a mile from the entrance to the bat caves in Enshi (stock photo)

Local Chinese media reported that six wet markets in Enshi had been closed by March 2020 before the rest of the world had gone into lockdown.

A supply chain source told The Post that some wild animals sold in Wuhan ‘had been sourced from Hubei province’, including from Enshi.

It has been reported that some of the wildlife farms are located only about a mile from the entrance to the bat caves in Enshi.

The caves have also been visited by humans. 

A spokesperson for the Chinese Embassy in Washington could not confirm if bats or farm-raised wild animals in Enshi were ever tested for the virus.

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