‘Capitol rioter’, 18, begs to be released to his parents


Bruno Joseph Cua (left), 18, of Milton, Georgia

One of the youngest alleged rioters of the January 6 insurrection has begged a judge to go home to his parents. 

Bruno Joseph Cua, 18, of Milton, Georgia, sent a letter to U.S. District Court Judge Randolph D. Moss on Thursday.

‘I just want to go home to my Mom and Dad, I am truly sorry,’ the letter from Cua said.

According to the Atlanta Journal-Constitution, Cua was arrested on February 5 and later denied bond a week later, leaving him jailed for a month.

Cua has appealed the initial bond denial.  

He is the youngest person charged in the insurrection at the Capitol, among more than 300 facing consequences in riot that left five dead.

Cua allegedly managed to reach the Senate chambers, one of the few rioters to actually do so. Prosecutors claim he assaulted a federal officer while trying to reach the Senate floor.

Cua was one of the alleged rioters who made his way to the Senate chambers on January 6

Cua was one of the alleged rioters who made his way to the Senate chambers on January 6

He allegedly assaulted a federal officer en route to the Senate chambers

He allegedly assaulted a federal officer en route to the Senate chambers

He is the youngest person charged in the insurrection at the Capitol, among more than 300 facing consequences in riot that left five dead.

Cua allegedly managed to reach the Senate chambers, one of the few rioters to actually do so. Prosecutors claim he assaulted a federal officer while trying to reach the Senate floor.

He is also accused of obstructing an official proceeding before Congress, which could lead to a jail sentence of up to 20 years.

‘All I ask is that you please allow me to be reunited with my loving family so we can figure out the next steps before I stand trial,’ Cua writes in his letter.

After entering a not guilty plea from an Oklahoma jail this week, Cua’s trial date was set for May 10.

Cua posted about his desire to go to Washington DC ahead of the Capitol riot

Cua posted about his desire to go to Washington DC ahead of the Capitol riot

On social media, he also appeared to admit to fighting to get into the building

On social media, he also appeared to admit to fighting to get into the building

Cua’s lawyers have argued that he is ‘an impressionable 18-year-old kid’ arrested amid finishing online high school, but the judge noted violent rhetoric in Cua’s digital past.

In the immediate aftermath of the insurrection, Cua posted this message on social media: ‘We didn’t attack American people. We attacked the swamp rats.’

He also said he wanted to ‘lock the swamp rat tyrants in the capitol and burn the place to the ground.’

‘Given how innaproprite [sic] my social media activity was, I truly understand your worries, and I appreciate you taking time to really consider the options,’ Cua wrote.

More than 300 people have been charged for their involvement in the Capitol riot

More than 300 people have been charged for their involvement in the Capitol riot

‘My posts were foolish, unnessacary, [sic] and untrue, thats [sic] not who I am or ever want to be, I have completely comprehended a very painful! [sic] Lesson over the last month in jail, including over two weeks in isolation.’

While Cua wants to be released to his parents, prosecutors have argued against it because his parents are the ones who drove him to Washington DC that day in the first place.

‘We never would have gone to Washington if we would have know things would have turned violent,’ the parents wrote in a letter to Judge Moss.

Cua is among the notable rioters who remain locked up as some others are receiving pretrial releases.

The QAnon Shaman and Richard Barnett, who put his feet up on the desk of Nancy Pelosi, remain in jail despite pleas for their own releases.

As for Cua, he is arguing that he is a changed man because of his stint in prison.

‘I will never be the same person, jail has had its full effect [sic] me, I am completely humbled , deeply remoursefull [sic] and regretful! 

‘After all, thats [sic] what jail is for right? Teaching people a lesson?

‘Lesson fully received, your Honor.’

Bruno Joseph Cua’s full letter 

‘Your Honor, I understand that you are concerned that I may be a danger, that I may act upon things I said. Given how innaproprite [sic] my social media activity was, I truly understand your worries, and I appreciate you taking time to really consider the options. 

I would like to strongly assure you that I am not a danger to anyone, and I will absolutely never act on what I said. I have yearned to speak with you, to truthfully apoligize [sic] and show you my forever changed heart. 

‘I will never be the same person, jail has had its full effect [sic] me, I am completely humbled , deeply remoursefull [sic] and regretful!. [sic] After all, thats [sic] what jail is for right? Teaching people a lesson? Lesson fully received, your Honor. 

‘My posts were foolish , unnessacary, [sic] and untrue, thats [sic] not who I am or ever want to be, I have completely comprehended a very painful! [sic] Lesson over the last month in jail, including over two weeks in isolation . [sic]

‘I have completely lost those aggressive feelings and moved on from the entire politcal [sic] idea. I was wrong.If [sic] you find it in your heart to to [sic] release me, I will dillegently [sic] abide by any and all conditions the court places on me. 

‘All I ask is that you please allow me to be reunited with my loving family so we can figure out the next steps before I stand trial. I promise I will not step one foot out of line, I miss my family more than anything in the world, I have never been away from them like this. 

‘I also would like you to know that these are my own words from the heart. I have not consulted with my anyone on what I should say, its [sic] simply the complete and honest truth. I just want to go home to my Mom and Dad, I am truly sorry. Thank you for your time and for considering my words, your Honor.’

– Bruno Cua 



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