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Biden’s DOJ SUES Texas over voting restrictions bill which pushed Democrats to flee the state


Biden’s DOJ SUES Texas over voting restrictions bill which pushed Democrats to flee the state in latest attack on Republican states changing ballot box rules

  • The DOJ argued new voting law violates a provision of the Voting Rights Act (VRA) that guarantees people can receive assistance at the voting booth
  • It also argued that the law violates the Civil Rights Act because it requires rejecting mail ballots due to ‘immaterial errors or omissions’ 
  • The Texas law established new requirements, and possible criminal penalties, for those who assist voters at the polls 
  • It also added new restrictions to voting by mail  


The Justice Department (DOJ) has filed suit against Texas, arguing its new voting law violates a provision of the Voting Rights Act (VRA) that guarantees people can receive assistance at the voting booth.   

The DOJ also argued that the law violates the Civil Rights Act because it requires rejecting mail ballots due to ‘immaterial errors or omissions.’ 

The DOJ’s suit says that these provisions will disenfranchise voters with limited English proficiency, voters with disabilities, voters in the military who are deployed and American citizens voting from abroad. 

The court filing notes that the Voting Rights Act guarantees that voters who require assistance to vote by reason of blindness, disability, or inability to read or write may receive assistance by a person of the voter’s choice. 

It notes that the Civil Rights Act ensures that voters will not be deprived of the right to vote because of an error or omission on a paper or record that is not material to the voter’s qualifications under State law to vote in an election. 

The Texas law established new requirements, and possible criminal penalties, stipulating that those who assist voters at the polls must fill out new paperwork detailing their relationship to the voter and must under oath swear that they did not ‘pressure or coerce’ the voter into choosing them for assistance. 

They must also pledge to limit their assistance to ‘reading the ballot to the voter, directing the voter to read the ballot, marking the voter’s ballot, or directing the voter to mark the ballot.’ 

The Texas bill also added new restrictions to voting by mail, where voters must include their driver’s license number, election identification certificate or the final four digits of their Social Security number and an ‘ink-on-paper’ signature that can be checked against any previous signature on file with the Texas Department of Public Safety. 

Other provisions not mentioned in the DOJ lawsuit include a ban on unmanned ballot drop boxes and 24-hour and drive-thru voting, a standardization of Election Day voting hours from 6am to 9pm, a ban on unsolicited mail ballot applications and the empowerment of partisan poll watchers.

The Justice Department, led by AG Merrick Garland, has filed suit against Texas, arguing its new voting law violates a provision of the Voting Rights Act (VRA) that guarantees people can receive assistance at the voting booth.

The Texas law established new requirements, and possible criminal penalties, stipulating that those who assist voters at the polls must fill out new paperwork and take an oath

The Texas law established new requirements, and possible criminal penalties, stipulating that those who assist voters at the polls must fill out new paperwork and take an oath 

Texas Gov. Greg Abbott signed the bill that incited a national frenzy, after a dramatic standoff with state Democrats. When they fled Texas to deny Republicans quorum to pass the vote, Abbott threatened to have them arrested. 

Attorney General Merrick Garland announced in June that he was doubling the size of the civil rights division in the DOJ to crack down on new voting restrictions in GOP-led states. 

‘There are many things open to debate in America, but the right of all eligible citizens to vote is not one of them,’ Garland said at the time. 

Meanwhile, Republicans filibustered the John Lewis Voting Rights Act for the fifth time on Wednesday, stopping the bill from moving forward in the legislative process.

The legislation, named after the late Congressman and civil rights activist, would replace part of the 1965 Voting Rights Act that the U.S. Supreme Court struck down in 2013.

The bill would also restore voters’ ability to challenge laws, such as those related redistricting or voter ID requirements that could be seen as discriminatory.

This the second time President Biden’s Justice Department is going to war with a state over voting rights – in June the DOJ filed suit against Georgia. 

Garland said at the time that the complaint centered on the DOJ’s claim that ‘recent changes to Georgia’s election laws were enacted with the purpose of denying or abridging the right of black Georgians to vote on account of their race or color, in violation of Section two of the Voting Rights Act.’  

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