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And Just Like That… gets negative reviews, critics brand Sex and the City reboot ‘painful downer’


HBO Max’s hotly-anticipated Sex and the City reboot is being met with a very cold shoulder from critics, who have widely panned the new series in a host of brutal reviews that brand Carrie Bradshaw’s return to screens ‘grim’, ‘awkward’ and a ‘painful downer’.          

The new series – entitled And Just Like That… – sees three of the four original leading ladies reuniting, with Sarah Jessica Parker, Kristin Davis, and Cynthia Nixon reprising their roles as Carrie, Charlotte York, and Miranda Hobbes. 

But it seems the on-screen star power was not enough to wow critics, who wasted no time in slamming the show’s lack of humor, overly-woke storylines, and ‘awkward’ plotlines following the premiere of the first two episodes on Thursday.     

The highly-anticipated Sex and the City reboot is finally here. The first two episodes of And Just Like That… premiered on Thursday – and has quickly been panned by critics 

The spinoff series sees original stars Sarah Jessica Parker, Kristin Davis, and Cynthia Nixon return to screens - but the reviews have branded the show a 'painful downer'

The spinoff series sees original stars Sarah Jessica Parker, Kristin Davis, and Cynthia Nixon return to screens – but the reviews have branded the show a ‘painful downer’ 

The first and second episodes were packed with glamor and sass - however, they were also filled with loss and sadness

At the end of the first episode, Carrie is left shocked and heartbroken, when her husband Mr. Big dies from a sudden heart attack after participating in a Peloton class

At the end of the first episode, Carrie is left shocked and heartbroken, when her husband Mr. Big dies from a sudden heart attack after participating in a Peloton class 

The second episode followed her as she makes funeral plans and prepares to say her final goodbye

The second episode followed her as she makes funeral plans and prepares to say her final goodbye 

According to the New York Times, the ‘cringey’ series has ‘lost its touch,’ with writer James Poniewozik claiming that it felt more like two shows than one – one that he called a ‘downer’ and the other that he described as a ‘painful’ attempt to update the original show.

‘One, which tries to grow with the women as they navigate their 50s and mortality, is a downer, but it takes risks and in moments is very good,’ he wrote.

‘The other, which tries to update its sassy turn-of-the-century sensibility for an era of diversity, is painful.’

He added that the show felt ‘oddly paced and grim, without quite managing catharsis,’ and that it’s ‘unfortunate jokes’ about today’s issues (like the coronavirus pandemic) did not help.

According to the New York Times , the 'cringey' series has 'lost its touch,' with writer James Poniewozik claiming that it felt more like two shows than one

According to the New York Times , the ‘cringey’ series has ‘lost its touch,’ with writer James Poniewozik claiming that it felt more like two shows than one 

He added that the show felt 'oddly paced and grim, without quite managing catharsis,' and that it's 'unfortunate jokes' about today's issues (like the coronavirus pandemic) did not help

He added that the show felt ‘oddly paced and grim, without quite managing catharsis,’ and that it’s ‘unfortunate jokes’ about today’s issues (like the coronavirus pandemic) did not help 

The original show aired in June of 1998 and went on for six seasons before it concluded in February of 2004. It was based on the book of the same name by Candace Bushnell

The original show aired in June of 1998 and went on for six seasons before it concluded in February of 2004. It was based on the book of the same name by Candace Bushnell 

The original show aired in June of 1998 and went on for six seasons before it concluded in February of 2004. It was based on the book of the same name by Candace Bushnell. 

Viewers were quick to notice that Kim Cattrall’s character Samantha Jones was missing from the revival, which is explained in the first few minutes of episode one.

According to her friends, the character moved to London and that’s why she was MIA. In real life, however, the actress has publicly feuded with her costars for years and did not want to participate in the new show. 

While the show lost one original cast member, it gained some new ones with Sarah Ramirez (Che Diaz), Nicole Ari Parker (Lisa Todd Wedley), Karen Pittman (Dr. Nya Wallace), and Sarita Chouhdury (Seema Patell). 

However, Deadline wrote in its review that it felt like the ‘problematic’ series added the ‘awkward’ new characters in an attempt to ‘check a box,’ and slammed executive producer Michael Patrick King for not updating the original characters enough.

‘There are far too many 2021 cultural touchstones and new characters are awkwardly parachuted into the luscious looking … revival of sorts, as if to check a box,’ they wrote.

‘Additionally, far too many of the original characters (now in the dusk of middle age) in the show … are pretty much unchanged from who they were all those years ago – which is true and problematic.’

Viewers quickly notice that Kim Cattrall's character Samantha Jones was missing from the revival. According to her friends, the character moved to London and that's why she was MIA

Viewers quickly notice that Kim Cattrall’s character Samantha Jones was missing from the revival. According to her friends, the character moved to London and that’s why she was MIA

Deadline called the series 'problematic' and slammed executive producer Michael Patrick King for not updating the original characters enough

Deadline called the series ‘problematic’ and slammed executive producer Michael Patrick King for not updating the original characters enough 

Plus, Washington Post author Inkoo Kang called the 'aggressive and exhausting' show a total 'bummer' and 'disappointment'

Plus, Washington Post author Inkoo Kang called the ‘aggressive and exhausting’ show a total ‘bummer’ and ‘disappointment’ 

The Guardian also called the show 'terrible,' and claimed that it 'reduced' the formerly-iconic trio into 'confused failures'

The Guardian also called the show ‘terrible,’ and claimed that it ‘reduced’ the formerly-iconic trio into ‘confused failures’ 

The Washington Post author Inkoo Kang called the ‘aggressive and exhausting’ show a total ‘bummer’ and ‘disappointment.’

She even dissed the showrunners for trying to ‘play catch up’ and ‘generate headlines.’ 

She wrote: ‘The zippy, intimate, charmingly featherlight landmark HBO series of yore has been replaced by yet another bloated streaming-service grief-com, the latest piece of intellectual property back in zombie form to generate headlines, pique nostalgia and ultimately disappoint us.

‘In previous iterations, its moments of emotional groundedness and deepening characterization had hit as hard as they did because of their contrast to the show’s essential tutu-cavorting buoyancy – a fact that the sequel misses entirely.

‘Detracting even more from the show’s innate sense of fun is its many mea culpas for the criticisms the show has received since its departure from the air nearly 20 years ago. If Sex and the City once drove the culture, it’s playing catch-up now.’

The Guardian also called the show ‘terrible,’ and claimed that it ‘reduced’ the formerly-iconic trio into ‘confused failures.’

They said: ‘It reduces the original characters to a baffled trio trying to negotiate a strange new world, as if the only thing ageing has to offer us (or women at least) is confusion and failure.’ 

Despite receiving many negative reviews, some people did enjoy the new show, with The New Yorker writer Emily Nussbaum tweeting: 'Watched the first two eps and liked them a lot'

Despite receiving many negative reviews, some people did enjoy the new show, with The New Yorker writer Emily Nussbaum tweeting: ‘Watched the first two eps and liked them a lot’

Despite receiving many negative reviews, some people did like the new show, with The New Yorker writer Emily Nussbaum tweeting: ‘Watched the first two eps of And Just Like That… and liked them a lot.

‘t’s not very much like SATC – it’s not arch, it’s not about sex – but it’s nice to see the characters and it’s updated in ways that make sense.

‘I was pretty wary of the project but now I’m curious to see where it goes.’

Attitude Magazine’s Juno Dawson said that after watching the series, she wanted to leave her reality to go live in theirs.

She gushed: ‘And just like that, I lost the will to live in reality, retreating wholly into the realm of imagination. It was better here.’ 

Andy Cohen also called the new show a ‘gift.’ 

‘WOW WOW WOW. What a gift,’ he wrote.



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