Entertainment

Amanda Knox has given birth to daughter Eureka – but claimed in her podcast baby was yet to be born


Amanda Knox has given birth to a baby girl, she has revealed – but deliberately told listeners to her podcast that she was still pregnant in a bid to avoid a media scrum.

Knox, 34, and her husband Christopher Robinson, 39, welcomed daughter Eureka Muse Knox-Robinson ‘several months ago’, she told The New York Times.

Knox explained that she and Robinson, who married in 2020 in a time travel-themed wedding, wanted to keep their daughter’s arrival a secret and so documented her pregnancy in their podcast, Labyrinths, but kept the birth secret. 

‘I’m still nervous about the paparazzi bounty on her head,’ said Knox, speaking to the paper from their home on Vashon Island near Seattle, in Washington State.

‘I will say I’m excited to not have to keep pretending not to be a mom. ‘Cause it’s like, my brain is just there.’

Amanda Knox and Christopher Robinson, a poet and novelist, have welcomed a daughter, Eureka. The couple married last year

Amanda Knox, now 34, is pictured in 2008 during her trial in Perugia, Italy, for the murder of Meredith Kercher. She was convicted and spent four years in prison, but then had her conviction overturned

Amanda Knox, now 34, is pictured in 2008 during her trial in Perugia, Italy, for the murder of Meredith Kercher. She was convicted and spent four years in prison, but then had her conviction overturned

Knox and her then-boyfriend Raffaele Sollecito, 36, were convicted of Kercher's murder in 2009 before being acquitted, convicted again and then finally definitely cleared in 2015. Pictured: The former couple in 2007, shortly after Kercher's body was found

Knox and her then-boyfriend Raffaele Sollecito, 36, were convicted of Kercher’s murder in 2009 before being acquitted, convicted again and then finally definitely cleared in 2015. Pictured: The former couple in 2007, shortly after Kercher’s body was found

Knox is pictured in a courtroom in Perugia in October 2011, when she was fighting her conviction for Kercher's murder

Knox is pictured in a courtroom in Perugia in October 2011, when she was fighting her conviction for Kercher’s murder

Knox told the paper that she was still struggling to find a balance between disliking the fame and needing to make money to live from.

She posted the photograph from her New York Times profile on Instagram, and captioned it: ‘Since my exoneration, I’ve struggled to reclaim my identity and protect the people I love from being exploited as tabloid content. 

‘It’s not easy, and I often feel like I’m trying to invent good choices out of bad whole cloth. 

‘I know that I cannot 100% protect my daughter from the kind of treatment I’ve suffered, but I’m doing the best I can. 

‘Which is why this will be the only picture of her I will ever share on social media. I’m so grateful to everyone who has wished @emceecarbon and I well on our journey to parenthood. 

‘Thank you for believing in us.’ 

Knox met Robinson when she interviewed him for her local newspaper, The West Seattle Herald, shortly after her final acquittal in 2015

Knox met Robinson when she interviewed him for her local newspaper, The West Seattle Herald, shortly after her final acquittal in 2015

Knox spent four years in prison in Perugia for the murder of her British roommate, Meredith Kercher, who was found dead in the house they shared in November 2007.

She was convicted in December 2009 and sentenced to 28 and a half years, but was acquitted in 2011 after an appeals court found that legal procedures had not been followed and there was no DNA tying her and then-boyfriend Raffaele Sollecito to the scene.

Meredith Kercher was sexually assaulted and stabbed to death in November 2007 while studying abroad in Perugia, in a case that garnered huge media attention

Meredith Kercher was sexually assaulted and stabbed to death in November 2007 while studying abroad in Perugia, in a case that garnered huge media attention

A local man, Rudy Guede, was convicted in a separate trial after his DNA was found on Kercher’s body and in the room where she died. He was sentenced to 16 years in prison in 2008, but was released in December 2020 and will spend the rest of his sentence doing community work.  

Knox was tried again in absentia, convicted again, and then ultimately had the conviction overturned by Italy’s highest court in 2015.

In 2013 Knox wrote a memoir, Waiting to Be Heard, for which she was given an advance of $3.8 million.

But her father Curt, an accountant, said that only around $200,000 of that remained after Knox had paid her legal bills; PR; the three mortgages her mother, father and grandmother took out to fund the fight; and a loan for her younger sister Deanna, who dropped out of college during the battle.

Knox and Robinson currently survive on the podcast, but are pitching a film adaptation of her memoir, a TV project about wrongful conviction, and a new book.

They also are considering, the paper reported, a series of NFTs out of famous tabloid covers with Knox’s face on them. 

Robinson, a novelist and poet, is working on a sci-fi novel and a nonfiction book about evolution, the future and psychedelics.



Source link

Related Articles

Back to top button